JUN 24, 2019 01:41 PM PDT

Mind-Controlled Robotic Arm?

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Considered a breakthrough in the field of noninvasive robotic device control, scientists have developed the first-ever mind-controlled robotic arm using a noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI) that tracks a cursor on a computer screen. The usage of noninvasive control of robotic devices may advance the quality of life for individuals living with paralysis and other movement disorders.

Credit: © Mihai Simonia / Adobe Stock

"Despite technical challenges using noninvasive signals, we are fully committed to bringing this safe and economic technology to people who can benefit from it," says Bin He, Trustee Professor and Department Head of Biomedical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. "This work represents an important step in noninvasive brain-computer interfaces, a technology which someday may become a pervasive assistive technology aiding everyone, like smartphones."

The paper, titled "Noninvasive neuroimaging enhances continuous neural tracking for robotic device control," establishes a framework addressing improvements for the "brain" and "computer" components of BCI. The authors approach suggests increasing user engagement and training and through EEG source imaging increasing the spatial resolution of noninvasive neural data.

 

 

"There have been major advances in mind controlled robotic devices using brain implants. It's excellent science," says He. "But noninvasive is the ultimate goal. Advances in neural decoding and the practical utility of noninvasive robotic arm control will have major implications on the eventual development of noninvasive neurorobotics."

Findings were published in Science Robotics and describes the researcher’s unique approaches using novel sensing and machine learning techniques to show enhanced BCI learning by 60% for traditional center-out tasks and enhanced continuous tracking of a computer cursor by over 500%.

Source: Carnegie Mellon University

About the Author
  • Nouran enjoys writing on various topics including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
DEC 08, 2019
Cannabis Sciences
DEC 08, 2019
Will Cannabis Facilities Pollute the Air?
The strong smell of cannabis comes from chemicals that could potentially cause indoor or outdoor air pollution, if not properly managed, a new study finds....
DEC 08, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 08, 2019
InSight Lander's Stymied 'Mole' On the Move Again
NASA’s InSight mission touched down on the Martian surface just under a year ago and has since deployed a suite of scientific instruments to investig...
DEC 08, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 08, 2019
NASA Unveils New Space Suits for the Artemis Program
NASA’s Artemis program promises to revolutionize deep space travel in ways that many never thought imaginable. One of the most significant things Art...
DEC 08, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 08, 2019
How Much Do You Know About NASA's Voyager Missions?
NASA’s Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft each launched in 1977 for a unique opportunity to explore the solar system’s outermost planets in unprecedent...
DEC 08, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 08, 2019
ESA's Solar Orbiter is Nearly Ready to Launch
Move over Parker Solar Probe, there’s a new Sun-orbiting spacecraft in town. The European Space Agency has completed the assembly of the Solar Orbite...
DEC 08, 2019
Technology
DEC 08, 2019
Can Screen-Time Structurally Affect a Child's Brain?
A study published in JAMA Pediatrics concludes that preschool-age children who have more screen time negatively impact regions of the brain involved with s...
Loading Comments...