FEB 05, 2017 06:46 AM PST

How Your Body Reacts to Quitting Smoking

WRITTEN BY: Xuan Pham
3 10 1005

No matter how you slice it, smoking is unequivocally dangerous to your health. Cigarette smoking is now the number one leading cause of preventable disease and death in the US. But, because nicotine is addictive, the habit is hard to break. As such, even knowing the health risks associated with smoking, about 40 million Americans still light up cigarettes daily.

And while it's best to never smoke, quitting smoking is still far better than continuing to smoke. The benefits of quitting smoking can begin in as little as an hour. With continued cessation, risks for disease and cancer slowly begin to drop. And in some cases, the risks may be comparable to people who have never smoked. A 40-year-old smoker could potentially live 9 years longer after having quit smoking as compare to continued smoking.

Of course smoking can induce some permanent biological changes, but it's never too late to quit!
About the Author
  • I am a human geneticist, passionate about telling stories to make science more engaging and approachable. Find more of my writing at the Hopkins BioMedical Odyssey blog and at TheGeneTwist.com.
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