AUG 20, 2017 10:06 AM PDT

Here's What's Inside of a Pimple

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard


No one like pimples, but they're a common occurrence in people of all ages; they can appear on almost any part of your body, and some scientists even suggest that where they pop up says a lot about why you're getting them in the first place.

At first glance, pimples look like little swollen red dots on the surface of the skin, sometimes exhibiting a white head. But digging deeper, science can tell us exactly what's inside of one.

After popping a pimple, it usually leaks puss; a thick white goopy mixture made up of bacteria, dead skin cells, sebum, and white blood cells. The bacteria Propionibacterium acnes can exist on your skin in smaller numbers without any issues, but too much can trigger your body into sending white blood cells to fight off infection, and this is what causes the red, swollen pimple.

Popping a pimple can cause even more issues, including scarring the skin around the area and allowing new foreign bacteria to enter the wound. It's better to use acne wash and to prevent acne in the first place by eating well and keeping up with your hygiene.

Keep in mind, however, that some pimples can be inescapable. For example, teenagers may experience uncontrollable acne outbreaks during puberty. It's possible to mitigate it with medication, but difficult to rid yourself of entirely.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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