SEP 25, 2017 3:10 PM PDT

Ever Wonder What Earth Might Look Like in 250 Million More Years?

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard


The Earth is always changing, and as millions of years pass, tectonic activity will inevitably shift existing land masses around on the planet's surface. With that in mind, what might the Earth look like after 250 million years?

If you remember the theory behind Pangea, the supercontinent that formed over 330 million years ago and broke apart over 170 million years ago, then what you're about to see might look familiar.

This video illustrates what tectonic experts think will happen to Earth's land masses over a period of 250 million years as activity takes its natural course.

The land masses on Earth today will have nowhere to go besides ramming into one another, just as they did in the distant past. Another supercontinent will take shape as the seven global continents come together and tall mountain ranges appear in regions where land masses come in contact with one another.

All the continents we know and love today will be unrecognizable on Earth 250 million years from now; but eventually, Earth's tectonics will force them apart once again, forming a whole host of new land masses that we'll never live to see.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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