APR 30, 2018 01:45 PM PDT

Uber Ride Sharing Hits the Bike Lane

WRITTEN BY: Julia Travers
3 2 205

A new venture expands Uber's established transportation fleet and mission to include the eco-friendly and healthy option of biking. In April 2018, the ride-sharing giant bought the bike-sharing company Jump, which already has established branches in six countries.

Uber will test the integration of Jump's 12,000 bikes into its standard program for a few months in San Francisco this Spring before launching a major roll-out.

The GPS-enabled bicycles feature electronic locks that allow them to be securely attached to any bike rack or other common urban structure like a lamppost or bench. Customers receive codes through a phone app to unlock the bikes. An extra bonus is the pedal-assist electric motor.
About the Author
  • Julia Travers is a writer, artist and teacher. She frequently covers science, tech and conservation.
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