JUN 06, 2018 07:28 PM PDT

How Dog Years Translate to Human Years

Has anyone ever told you that a dog year is equivalent to seven human years? If they did, then they’d be wrong. In fact, different dogs age at different rates, depending on numerous factors.

For whatever reason, dogs mature much more quickly in their first year of life than humans do, and smaller dogs seem to out-live larger ones.

Citing some number-crunching performed by Priceonomics, a 9-year-old small dog would be 52 years old in human years, while a 9-year-old giant dog would be almost 71. These figures leave a significant gap for mid-sized dogs, indicating that there’s more to the picture than meets the eye.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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