DEC 23, 2013 08:16 AM PST

Can Microbes Clean Up Our Oily Mess?



With an estimated 70 oil spills every day in the U.S. and tons of plastic garbage littering our oceans, humans could really use some help cleaning up. Scientific American editor David Biello explains how bacteria and other microbes slowly consume our mess.
About the Author
  • I love all things science and am passionate about bringing science to the public through writing. With an M.S. in Genetics and experience in cancer research, marketing and technical writing, it is a pleasure to share the latest trends and findings in science on LabRoots.
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