NOV 11, 2014 09:47 AM PST

Dartmouth Study: Low-Dose CT Can be Cost-Effective in Lung Cancer Screening

WRITTEN BY: Judy O'Rourke
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Researchers from Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, say lung cancer screening in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) meets a commonly accepted standard for cost effectiveness as reported in the November 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. This relatively new screening test uses annual low-dose CT scans to spot lung tumors early in individuals facing the highest risks of lung cancer due to age and smoking history.

[Source: Dartmouth-Hitchcock]
About the Author
  • Judy O'Rourke worked as a newspaper reporter before becoming chief editor of Clinical Lab Products magazine. As a freelance writer today, she is interested in finding the story behind the latest developments in medicine and science, and in learning what lies ahead.
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