JAN 14, 2015 04:36 PM PST

Stretchy synthetic skin has sense of touch and warmth


The first prosthetic skin to simulate the sense of touch is being developed by researchers at Seoul National University. Researchers have tried to find a pathway for the skin to send signals to the brain, however they were not successful. Study authors say more work is needed with larger animals.
About the Author
  • I'm a writer living in the Boston area. My interests include cancer research, cardiology and neuroscience. I want to be part of using the Internet and social media to educate professionals and patients in a collaborative environment.
You May Also Like
OCT 31, 2018
Videos
OCT 31, 2018
Why does severe pain cause vomiting?
Feeling nausea or vomiting are known to be common side effects of severe pain. But, why? To answer this question, research was conducted on surgical patien...
NOV 07, 2018
Health & Medicine
NOV 07, 2018
Here's How Far Your Sneeze Can Travel
When you get stuck with a cold or the flu, sneezes are inevitable. But have you ever wondered how far your sneezes travel? As it turns out, your sneeze may...
NOV 14, 2018
Plants & Animals
NOV 14, 2018
Here's What Happens When a Fly Lands on Your Food
If you’re like me, then you probably hate it when flies land on your food. But why is it such a big deal anyway? When flies land on your food, it&rsq...
NOV 15, 2018
Videos
NOV 15, 2018
A Season of Outbreaks
In a few different places around the world, people are facing disease outbreaks due to pathogenic microbes....
DEC 10, 2018
Space & Astronomy
DEC 10, 2018
Learn More About How NASA Built the Parker Solar Probe
When NASA built the Solar Parker Probe to embark on its mission to study the Sun, they knew it’d need to be built with bleeding-edge technology to ma...
DEC 13, 2018
Chemistry & Physics
DEC 13, 2018
Biochemical Antifreezes: How Do They Work?
How do fish survive in the Arctic ocean where the temperature is under zero degree Celsius most of the year? They rely on a class of polypeptides called th...
Loading Comments...