APR 28, 2015 11:02 AM PDT

Brief History of the Iconic CO2 Keeling Curve

WRITTEN BY: Will Hector

The video tells the story of how Charles David Keeling of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, worked with scientists from the U.S. Weather Bureau and NOAA at NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory to create what is now an iconic record of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere.
About the Author
  • Will Hector practices psychotherapy at Heart in Balance Counseling Center in Oakland, California. He has substantial training in Attachment Theory, Hakomi Body-Centered Psychotherapy, Psycho-Physical Therapy, and Formative Psychology. To learn more about his practice, click here: http://www.heartinbalancetherapy.com/will-hector.html
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