MAY 15, 2015 05:53 PM PDT

Modern 'Marshmallow Test' Shows Kids Delaying Pleasure

WRITTEN BY: Will Hector
2 24 1362

This is a very rough approximation of the marshmallow test conducted by Walter Mischel and associates at Stanford University in the 1960s, which is discussed in my article in the Trending section. Its best feature is that it demonstrates some of what Mischel refers to as the cognitive tools children use to successfully distract themselves from eating the marshmallow.
About the Author
  • Will Hector practices psychotherapy at Heart in Balance Counseling Center in Oakland, California. He has substantial training in Attachment Theory, Hakomi Body-Centered Psychotherapy, Psycho-Physical Therapy, and Formative Psychology. To learn more about his practice, click here: http://www.heartinbalancetherapy.com/will-hector.html
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