JAN 03, 2016 3:54 PM PST

Here's Why Our Bodies Don't Like Winter So Much

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard


Although some of us are Winter people because the hotter Summer season can be exhausting, the general rule of thumb is that our bodies aren't exactly built for constantly-changing seasons and that our bodies are typically better at their functions in the warmer months of the year when there's more sunlight available to us.

Not only does the Winter season wreak havoc on our bodies' circadian rhythm because of the fact that it becomes darker earlier, but it also affects our abilities to metabolize our medications, our mood, and even our genes.

Less sunlight affects our sleep cycle, vitamin D intake, and can even make us feel gloomier than we would in the Summer or Spring months.

The important lesson to learn here is that although Winter is a great time the year to be with family and to enjoy what's often called "the most wonderful time of the year," our bodies still require the sunlight they are prone to all throughout the year, which can be more difficult to achieve during these months.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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