MAY 14, 2016 09:00 PM PDT

The Medicinal Benefits of Stinging Nettle


Since ancient times, stinging nettle has been used in food and medicine. The plant is a single-stemmed perennial that can grow up to 7 feet tall. It is a native plant of northern Africa, Western North America, Europe, and Asia. It is the most common member of the nettle genus.

When brewed into tea, the plant can help cure mucus congestion and a myriad of problems related to digestion, such as diarrhea and water retention. When externally applied, the plant helps relieve throat infections, eczema, burns, and rheumatism. Stinging nettle is rich in iron, potassium, manganese, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C.
About the Author
  • Julianne (@JuliChiaet) covers health and medicine for LabRoots. Her work has been published in The Daily Beast, Scientific American, and MailOnline. While primarily a science journalist, she has also covered culture and Japanese organized crime. She is the New York Board Representative for the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA). • To read more of her writing, or to send her a message, go to Jchiaet.com
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