JUN 07, 2016 10:07 PM PDT

Why do mosquitoes like to bite ME?!


Ever wonder (or complain) why you seem to get eaten alive by mosquito bites when the person sitting right next to you only gets one or two bites? Well, according to a new study from a group of UK scientists, it's because your body doesn't naturally produce a "cloaking scent," that can camouflage your juicy flesh from those bloodsuckers.

Mosquitoes also differentiate between the microbes on people's skin, and turns out some of them are tastier than others. Another factor is your carbon dioxide output - which mosquitoes love. Bigger people emit more CO2, which might mean more bites for you. They also are attracted to movement and heat - which explains why you get a million bites during that pickup soccer match.

With this information, the most important thing you can do is protect yourself. Other than the popular DEET option, citronella oil, lavender oil, catnip oil, and garlic are great ways to fend off skeeters too.
About the Author
  • Kathryn is a curious world-traveller interested in the intersection between nature, culture, history, and people. She has worked for environmental education non-profits and is a Spanish/English interpreter.
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