JUN 18, 2016 09:23 AM PDT

This Sidewinder Snake Slithers at 18 MPH

2 6 308

The sidewinder snake is well adapted for its harsh desert habitat. With its unique movement, it can travel up to 18 miles per hour across the shifting sand dunes. It does so by anchoring its head and tail to the ground and thrusting its body forward. The movement creates grip, much like a foot.

Sidewinding is also a heat-coping mechanism in the scorching desert where these animals live. By reducing the body's contact with the sand, the snake can keep its body temperature regulated.

Sidewinders will use their camouflaged skin to bury themselves in the sand and wait for their prey to come close. When they do, the snake will quickly strike and its potent venom will do the rest of the work.

Source: Smithsonian
About the Author
  • Kathryn is a curious world-traveller interested in the intersection between nature, culture, history, and people. She has worked for environmental education non-profits and is a Spanish/English interpreter.
You May Also Like
JUL 18, 2018
Videos
JUL 18, 2018
What Does it Take to Burst a Stomach?
People often say they feel like they feel like they’re going to burst after consuming a large meal, but is it really possible for your stomach to bur
JUL 22, 2018
Videos
JUL 22, 2018
How far can a single breath can go?
Longest distance swam underwater in one breath by a female using fins. Can you imagine being the Guinness World record-holder of that title? Marina Kazanko
JUL 27, 2018
Videos
JUL 27, 2018
Ever Wonder Why the Moon Turns Red During A Lunar Eclipse?
Lunar eclipses can be fun to observe, but have you ever wondered why the Moon turns red during the event? As it turns out, this red Moon phenomenon, also k
JUL 29, 2018
Space & Astronomy
JUL 29, 2018
Algae in Space: A Potential Food and Fuel Source?
During SpaceX’s recent CRS-15 launch, a mission to resupply the International Space Station with fresh supplies, the commercial space company’s
JUL 30, 2018
Videos
JUL 30, 2018
Why Does Venus Spin In The Wrong Direction?
Scientists first discovered planet Venus as an inferno of acid rain. But, most uniquely, it was a planet that spins backward. In astronomy, backward spinni
AUG 01, 2018
Videos
AUG 01, 2018
Goodbye to the Endangered Species Act?
The Endangered Species Act, which protects more than 2,000 plant, animal and insect species at risk of
Loading Comments...