JUL 21, 2016 09:07 AM PDT

Incredible Time-Lapse of Earth from 1 Million Miles Away


NASA has shared a new video on YouTube this week of what appears to be a time lapse of the Earth over a span of one year's worth of time.

The video is essentially a high-speed and high-detail image slideshow of photographs taken over the course of a year from one million miles away by NASA's EPIC camera, which sits on board the NOAA's DSCOVR satellite.

At this location, the satellite is perfectly balanced in gravitational pull between the Earth and the Sun.

The spacecraft captured images in multiple color spectrums: red, green, and blue, to produce an image that most closely resembles the planet as our eyes would see it from this distance.

Despite the cool video, this is not the primary objective of the spacecraft. Instead, it's out there to observe solar wind activity and provide real-time space weather alerts.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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