JUN 09, 2015 11:00 AM PDT

Carbapenemase-producing GNB: The Nightmare Bacteria Are Here to Stay

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Speakers
  • Instructor, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Rush University Medical Center
    Biography
      Nicholas earned his Bachelor of Science degree at Saint Louis University in 2007. His undergraduate degree in Investigative and Medical Science was housed in the then Department of Clinical Laboratory Science in the Edward and Margaret C. Doisy College of Health Sciences. He earned his Master of Science degree in Clinical Laboratory Science at Rush University in Chicago. Upon graduation, he worked for two years in the microbiology and core laboratories at Rush University Medical Center. In 2011, he accepted a position as a laboratory director in a long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) in Chicago. While in the LTACH, he was involved with investigators in a CDC-funded study (1U54CK00161, RA Weinstein, PI). Their research involved the implementation of an infection control bundle to reduce Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) transmission and infection in the LTACH setting. He is currently an instructor in clinical microbiology in the Department of Medical Laboratory Science at Rush University Medical Center and is a doctoral candidate. His research efforts focus on KPC and other antimicrobial resistance mechanisms among Gram-negative bacilli.

    Abstract:
    Carbapenemase-producing Gram-Negative Bacilli are the latest public health threat, spreading rapidly across the globe in the last decade. The Chicago region has experienced a growing outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, especially within post-acute care facilities. In addition to KPC, other carbapenemases (NDM, OXA-48) have also been identified from Chicago patients through surveillance screening cultures. This webinar will discuss recent outbreaks of carbapenemase-producing GNB, along with different techniques clinical microbiology laboratories can utilize to screen suspicious isolates for carbapenemase production, and the role that post-acute care facilities play in regional spread of those organisms.

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