MAY 11, 2015 01:00 PM PDT
Isolation and characterization of exosomes and ectosomes
SPONSORED BY: Beckman Coulter Life Sciences
CONTINUING EDUCATION (CME/CE/CEU) CREDITS: P.A.C.E. CE
15 81 25981

Speakers:
  • Laboratory head, Dept. of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS), La Trobe University
    Biography
      After completing a Master's degree in Biotechnology in India, Suresh undertook a PG Diploma in Bioinformatics in Pondicherry University, India (2004). During this time, he started enjoying research and subsequently commenced his PhD with particular emphasis on proteomics and bioinformatics technologies. During this tenure, he spent close to three years as a research trainee at Johns Hopkins University, USA. He analysed human protein interaction networks, large scale phosphoproteomics datasets and developed Human Proteinpedia, a portal for integrating heterogeneous proteomic datasets. Upon completion of his PhD, he moved to the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Australia as a postdoctoral fellow. During this tenure, he studied the role of exosomes, secreted microvesicles, in colorectal cancer progression and as reservoirs of potential biomarkers. In July 2011, he moved to an independent laboratory as head of the Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Sciences in Melbourne, Australia. Research in the Mathivanan laboratory revolves around understanding the role of exosomes in cancer and intercellular communication. In addition to biochemical experiments, he also has hands on experience in bioinformatics. Mathivanan laboratory developed and maintains two widely used web-based database for exosome/extracellular vesicle research namely ExoCarta and Vesiclepedia. Mathivanan laboratory has been working on exosomes for the last 8 years.

    Abstract:
    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics and experimental approach highlighted that exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Learn how follow up integrated bioinformatics and experimental approach highlighted that exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes
    • Learn how using label-free quantitative proteomics, proteins were highlighted that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes
    • Learn how cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes

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