MAY 10, 2017 09:00 AM PDT

Keynote Presentation: Using Networks to Understand the Genotype-Phenotype Connection

C.E. CREDITS: CEU | P.A.C.E. CE | Florida CE
Speakers
  • Professor of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Chair of the Department of Biostatistics, Harvard University, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Biography
      John Quackenbush is Professor of Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and Chair of the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and Professor of Biostatistics and Computational Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. John's PhD was in Theoretical Physics, in 1992 he received a fellowship from the National Institutes of Health to work on the Human Genome Project, which led him from the Salk Institute to Stanford University to The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) before moving to Harvard in 2005. He currently directs the Computational Biology and Quantitative Genetics MS program and is PI of the BD2K Training Grant at HSPH. John's research uses massive data from DNA sequencing and other assays to model functional networks in human cells. By comparing networks between groups of individuals, he has found new drug targets, explored chemotherapy resistance, and investigated differences between the sexes. He has received numerous awards for his work, including recognition in 2013 as a White House Open Science Champion of Change. He is also the co-founder of Genospace, a precision medicine software company that was purchased by the Hospital Corporation of America in 2017.

    Abstract:

    Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses have identified genetic associations with a wide range of human phenotypes. However, many of these variants have weak effects and understanding their combined effect remains a challenge. One hypothesis is that multiple SNPs interact in complex networks to influence functional processes that ultimately lead to complex phenotypes, including disease states. Here we present CONDOR, a method that represents both cis- and trans-acting SNPs and the genes with which they are associated as a bipartite graph and then uses the modular structure of that graph to place SNPs into a functional context. In applying CONDOR to eQTLs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we found the global network “hub” SNPs were devoid of disease associations through GWAS. However, the network was organized into 52 communities of SNPs and genes, many of which were enriched for genes in specific functional classes. We identified local hubs within each community (“core SNPs”) and these were enriched for GWAS SNPs for COPD and many other diseases. These results speak to our intuition: rather than single SNPs influencing single genes, we see groups of SNPs associated with the expression of families of functionally related genes and that disease SNPs are associated with the perturbation of those functions. These methods are not limited in their application to COPD and can be used in the analysis of a wide variety of disease processes and other phenotypic traits


    Show Resources
    You May Also Like
    SEP 05, 2019 04:00 PM CEST
    C.E. CREDITS
    SEP 05, 2019 04:00 PM CEST
    DATE: September 5, 2019TIME: 7:00am PT, 10:00am ET, 4:00pm CEST PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) has gone through a massive evolution since its development in 1983. Besides it...
    MAY 16, 2019 04:00 PM CEST
    C.E. CREDITS
    MAY 16, 2019 04:00 PM CEST
    DATE: May 16, 2019TIME: 7:00am PDT, 10:00am EDT, 4:00pm CEST The emergence of NGS is revolutionizing the microbiological sciences and transforming medicine. Deep sequencing has...
    JUN 05, 2019 05:00 PM CEST
    C.E. CREDITS
    JUN 05, 2019 05:00 PM CEST
    DATE: June 5, 2019TIME: 8:00am PDT, 11:00am EDT, 5:00pm CEST Eukaryotic cell cultures respond to the most subtle influence. Apart from the risk of contamination, minimal chan...
    NOV 18, 2019 07:00 AM PST
    Add to Calendar Select one of the following: iCal Google Calendar Outlook Calendar Yahoo Calendar
    C.E. CREDITS
    NOV 18, 2019 07:00 AM PST
    Add to Calendar Select one of the following: iCal Google Calendar Outlook Calendar Yahoo Calendar
    DATE: November 18, 2019TIME: 7:00am PST, 11:00am EST, 4:00pm CEWT How often do you pipette in your cell culture lab every day? Usually, we do it so often that we tend stop th...
    AUG 27, 2019 09:00 AM PDT
    C.E. CREDITS
    AUG 27, 2019 09:00 AM PDT
    DATE: August 27, 2019 TIME: 9:00am PDT, 12:00pm EDT Immunotherapies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have proven remarkably effective for treating cancer in some patients, with considerabl...
    OCT 02, 2019 11:00 AM PDT
    OCT 02, 2019 11:00 AM PDT
    DATE: October 2, 2019TIME: 11:00am PDT, 2:00pm EDT Ditch the Excel spreadsheets and manage your molecular workflows entirely in your LIMS Achieve configuration of molecular workf...
    Loading Comments...
    Show Resources