MENU
APR 30, 2015 8:00 AM PDT

Swimming in Transcriptomics: Using Next-Gen sequencing to study the evolution of neural circuitry and swimming behavior of sea slugs

Speaker

Abstract

Sea slugs (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudipleura) provide unique opportunities for studying the evolution of behavior at the levels of single neurons, neural circuits, and their synaptic connections. Of particular interest to us are the mechanisms by which analogous forms of swimming behavior, such as dorsal-ventral (DV) or left-right (LR) body flexions, evolved independently in certain sea slug clades. Transcriptome sequencing has been useful for this research in two ways: first, it provides a means for characterizing the phylogenetic relationships amongst sea slug species, where robust phylogenetic trees can be constructed using hundreds of orthologous gene sequences. Indeed, a strong understanding of species phylogeny is a necessary pre-requisite for formulating hypotheses about how DV and LR swimming might have evolved in different lineages. Secondly, transcriptome sequencing provides unprecedented access to gene sequences from the sea slug brain, which can be used to probe the molecular mechanisms by which single neurons are recruited into rhythmic circuits to drive analogous forms of swimming. To illustrate, the lab previously found that in two species that independently evolved DV swimming, homologous single neurons called C2 independently acquired sensitivity to serotonin (5HT) to potentiate their synapses and activate their corresponding DV swimming neural circuits. We are now testing the hypothesis that convergent alterations in 5HT receptor function/expression in C2 neurons is responsible for this synaptic potentiation, having identified from the transcriptomes full length sequences for all known molluscan 5HT receptors.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn how transcriptome sequencing has been useful for the research of sea slugs and the mechanisms by which analogous forms of swimming behavior, such as dorsal-ventral (DV) or left-right (LR) body flexions, evolved independently in certain sea slug clades
  • Learn how transcriptome sequencing provides a means for characterizing the phylogenetic relationships amongst sea slug species, where robust phylogenetic trees can be constructed using hundreds of orthologous gene sequences.
  • Learn how transcriptome sequencing provides unprecedented access to gene sequences from the sea slug brain, which can be used to probe the molecular mechanisms by which single neurons are recruited into rhythmic circuits to drive analogous forms of swimming

Show Resources
You May Also Like
MAY 11, 2021 10:00 AM PDT
C.E. CREDITS
MAY 11, 2021 10:00 AM PDT
Date: May 11, 2021 Time: 10:00zm PDT Your samples are some of the most valuable assets in the laboratory. After spending countless hours on extraction and preparation, your conclusions could...
JUL 15, 2021 9:00 AM PDT
JUL 15, 2021 9:00 AM PDT
Date: July 15, 2021 Time: 9:00am (PDT), 12:00pm (EDT) The Pisces workflow robust, easy-to-use, end-to-end multi-omics solution for highly multiplexed targeted Spatial RNA analysis. VeranomeB...
SEP 14, 2021 7:00 AM PDT
C.E. CREDITS
SEP 14, 2021 7:00 AM PDT
Date: September 14, 2021 Time: 7am PDT, 10am EDT, 4pm CEST A conventional thermal cycler has long been a commodity product in the lab and end-point PCR techniques can be completed almost wit...
JUN 09, 2021 7:00 AM PDT
C.E. CREDITS
JUN 09, 2021 7:00 AM PDT
Date: June 9, 2021 Time: 09 June 2021, 7am PDT, 10am EDT, 4pm CEST cells with dramatic implications on the validity of past cell culture related research. The fact that at least 509 cell lin...
JUN 10, 2021 10:00 AM PDT
C.E. CREDITS
JUN 10, 2021 10:00 AM PDT
Date: June 10, 2021 Time: 10:00am (PDT), 1:00pm (EDT) Microglia, the primary brain macrophages, regulate a plethora of processes that impact the organization of neural circuits, including sy...
NOV 17, 2021 8:00 AM PST
C.E. CREDITS
NOV 17, 2021 8:00 AM PST
Date: November 17, 2021 Time: 8:00am (PDT), 11:00am (EDT) From waste disposal to promising biomarkers and therapeutic agents, exosomes and other extracellular vesicles are valuable in resear...
Loading Comments...
Show Resources