MAR 04, 2015 3:52 PM PST

Preventing the Spread of Cancer with Copper Molecules

WRITTEN BY: Ilene Schneider
Chemists at Bielefeld University have developed a molecule containing copper that binds specifically with DNA and prevents the spread of cancer. First results show that it kills the cancer cells more quickly than cisplatin - a widely used anti-cancer drug that is frequently administered in chemotherapy. When developing the anti-tumour agent, Professor Dr. Thorsten Glaser and his team cooperated with biochemists and physicists. The design of the new agent is basic research. ‘How and whether the copper complex will actually be given to cancer patients is something that medical research will have to determine in the years to come,' said the chemist.



Ever since the end of the 1970s, doctors have been using cisplatin to treat cancer. For lung cancer and testicular cancer, the drug promotes healing; however, it does not work for all types of cancer. Cisplatin is also one of the anti-cancer drugs that most frequently induce nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea. ‘Therefore we wanted to develop an alternative agent that would work differently, have fewer side effects, and treat other types of cancer as well,' said Thorsten Glaser, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at Bielefeld University. ‘In addition, we wanted an agent that would treat cancers that have become immune to cisplatin through its use in earlier treatments.' Glaser and his team are using methods from chemistry to produce new molecules that are not found in nature, and to equip these with specific properties.

Cisplatin attacks the DNA of cancer cells. DNA is composed of nucleobases, phosphates, and sugar. Whereas cisplatin binds with the nucleobases, the new molecule developed by the researchers attacks the phosphate in the DNA. ‘We did this by integrating two metal ions of copper in our molecule that preferentially bind with phosphates.' As soon as the ions bind with the phosphate, the DNA of the cancer cell changes. This disrupts the cellular processes, prevents the cell from reproducing, and leads to the destruction of the pathological cell. ‘Just as a key only works in one specific lock, our molecule only fits the phosphates and blocks them,' said Glaser. A bit like the end of a horseshoe, there are two metal ions of copper protruding from the new molecule. The gap between the two ends of the horseshoe corresponds exactly to that between the phosphates in the DNA so that they can dock together and form a perfect fit. ‘Because two phosphates bind simultaneously, the binding strength is greater. And that increases the efficacy.'

The scientists at Bielefeld University have developed a procedure for manufacturing the new molecule. They have proved that their copper agent can bind with DNA and change it. And they have studied whether and how well their agent prevents the spread of the DNA and thereby of the cells. The replication of the genome in cells proceeds in a similar way to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The researchers have confirmed that the copper complex stops this chain reaction.

Finally, the scientists applied the agent to cancer cells. They administered the substance to a cell culture with cancer cells. The result was that ‘the copper complex is more effective than cisplatin,' said Glaser. ‘The highest number of cancer cells died at a concentration of 10 micromolar. With cisplatin, you need 20 micromolar.'

Source: Bielefeld University
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
JUN 14, 2021
Health & Medicine
Another Benefit of Aspirin: Decreased Colorectal Cancer Risk When Started Early
JUN 14, 2021
Another Benefit of Aspirin: Decreased Colorectal Cancer Risk When Started Early
Valued for stroke and heart attack prevention, aspirin is also recommended for colorectal cancer prevention. A Harv ...
JUN 07, 2021
Cancer
Inflammatory-rich diet associated with greater risk of developing breast cancer
JUN 07, 2021
Inflammatory-rich diet associated with greater risk of developing breast cancer
A breakthrough study soon to be presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE later this week reports that women who main ...
JUN 05, 2021
Cancer
How is the new hospital price transparency rule going?
JUN 05, 2021
How is the new hospital price transparency rule going?
New findings from an analysis of hospital price transparency have been published recently in JAMA. The analysis was ...
AUG 25, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Self-Assembling Molecules: A Potential "One-Size-Fits-All" Cancer Therapy
AUG 25, 2021
Self-Assembling Molecules: A Potential "One-Size-Fits-All" Cancer Therapy
A new study from the University of Huddersfield shows promising breakthroughs on the use of self-assembling molecules as ...
SEP 02, 2021
Immunology
Hobit Activates Cancer-Killing Immune Cells
SEP 02, 2021
Hobit Activates Cancer-Killing Immune Cells
Innate lymphoid cells, or ILCs, are specialized immune cells that are increasingly entering the research spotlight. Thes ...
OCT 12, 2021
Immunology
Cancer Drug Helps Alzheimer's Mice Remember
OCT 12, 2021
Cancer Drug Helps Alzheimer's Mice Remember
What if a drug—specifically developed to treat one disease—had the potential to address other non-related co ...
Loading Comments...