MAR 17, 2015 10:23 AM PDT

Oncologists Share Reasons for Cancer Drugs' High Cost, Recommend Solutions

Increasingly high prices for cancer drugs are affecting patient care in the U.S. and the American health care system overall, say the authors of a special article published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

"Americans with cancer pay 50 percent to 100 percent more for the same patented drug than patients in other countries," says S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D., of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, who is one of the authors. "As oncologists we have a moral obligation to advocate for affordable cancer drugs for our patients."

Dr. Rajkumar and his colleague, Hagop Kantarjian, M.D., of MD Anderson Cancer Center, say the average price of cancer drugs for about a year of therapy increased from $5,000 to $10,000 before 2000 to more than $100,000 by 2012. Over nearly the same period the average household income in the U.S. decreased by about 8 percent.

In the paper, the authors rebut the major arguments the pharmaceutical industry uses to justify the high price of cancer drugs, namely, the expense of conducting research and drug development, the comparative benefits to patients, that market forces will settle prices to reasonable levels, and that price controls on cancer drugs will stifle innovation.

"One of the facts that people do not realize is that cancer drugs for the most part are not operating under a free market economy," says Dr. Rajkumar. "The fact that there are five approved drugs to treat an incurable cancer does not mean there is competition. Typically, the standard of care is that each drug is used sequentially or in combination, so that each new drug represents a monopoly with exclusivity granted by patent protection for many years."

Drs. Rajkumar and Kantarjian say other reasons for the high cost of cancer drugs include legislation that prevents Medicare from being able to negotiate drug prices and a lack of value- based pricing, which ties the cost of a drug to its relative effectiveness compared to other drugs.

The authors recommend a set of potential solutions to help control and reduce the high cost of cancer drugs in the U.S. Some of their recommendations are already in practice in other developed countries. Their recommendations include:

Allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices.

Develop cancer treatment pathways/guidelines that incorporate the cost and benefit of cancer drugs.

Allow the Food and Drug Administration or physician panels to recommend target prices based on a drug's magnitude of benefit (value-based pricing).

Eliminate "pay-for-delay" strategies in which a pharmaceutical company with a brand name drug shares profits on that drug with a generic drug manufacturer for the remainder of a patent period, effectively eliminating a patent challenge and competition.

Allow the importation of drugs from abroad for personal use.

Allow the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and other cancer advocacy groups to consider cost in their recommendations.

Create patient-driven grassroots movements and organizations to advocate effectively for the interests of patients with cancer to balance advocacy efforts of pharmaceutical companies, insurance companies, pharmacy outlets and hospitals.

Source: Mayo Clinic
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
JUL 17, 2018
Cancer
JUL 17, 2018
Immunotherapy Diversification: From CAR-T cells to CAR-NK cells
New advances have made it possible for immunotherapy researchers to use natural killer cells, which are our body's normal defense for cancerous cells, to target tumors....
SEP 13, 2018
Cancer
SEP 13, 2018
Breast tumors can stop their own metastasis
According to the American cancer society, metastatic breast cancers or stage 4 breast cancers have 5-years survival rate of 22% which is lower than at early stages. Metastatic breast cancer...
SEP 14, 2018
Health & Medicine
SEP 14, 2018
Can You Get Addicted to Tanning at the Gym?
Do you know what GTL means? If you're a fan of the reality series "The Jersey Shore" then you know it stands for "Gym, Tan, Laundry"...
NOV 02, 2018
Cell & Molecular Biology
NOV 02, 2018
Natural Molecule Enables Obese Mice to Shed Weight
A molecule that has been a focus of cancer research has been found to be a significant regulator of metabolism....
NOV 26, 2018
Cell & Molecular Biology
NOV 26, 2018
New Insight Into the Machinery That Drives Cell Death
When cells are worn out and damaged or diseased, they can initiate a self-destruct sequence called apoptosis....
DEC 04, 2018
Immunology
DEC 04, 2018
Why is Skin Cancer so Elusive?
A pathway involved in skin cancer reveals a potential immunotherapy target...
Loading Comments...