JAN 10, 2019 1:00 PM PST

Nutrient Rich Diet Helps Heart Patients Avoid Death

WRITTEN BY: Abbie Arce

We all know that eating a healthy diet diverse in nutrients is an essential component of healthy living. Now a new study has shown that nutrient-rich food could help prevent death and hospitalizations in heart failure patients.

The study, led by the University of Kentucky, was published in the Journal of the American Heart Association (AHA). The study examines data from 246 patients from three heart failure clinics in Georgia, Indiana, and Kentucky.

Researchers found that people with heart failure who lacked seven or more micronutrients had a much higher risk of dying or being readmitted to the hospital.

Patients involved in the study were asked to keep track of everything they ate and drank for four consecutive days in a food diary. Researchers then used these diaries to assess the intake of 17 micronutrients, 11 vitamins, and six minerals. Patients were also asked to touch base with researchers once a month for the following year.

The study found that 25% of patients with no or only a few deficiencies were hospitalized or died. That number jumped to a shocking 44% in those who had deficiencies in seven or more micronutrients.

This highlights why information on proper nutrition should be incorporated into every patient's heart recovery program. Patients should receive a copy of current nutritional guidelines and tips on achieving a nutritionally diverse diet before being discharged. With proper education, patients can make informed dietary decisions to avoid these risks to their health.

In the above video Charlotte Lawson, a nutritionist and dietitian, speaks about some of what makes “bad” foods bad, and how to avoid them after a heart attack. She also provides some tips on how to get all the nutrients you need after a heart attack so that you may prevent deficiencies.


 

Sources: Health and Human ServicesAmerican Heart Association

About the Author
  • Abbie is an AFAA certified personal trainer and fitness instructor with an interest in all things health-science. She has recently graduated with her BS in Applied Sport and Exercise Science from Barry University in Miami. Next, she intends to earn an MPH with a focus in Epidemiology.
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