MAR 09, 2019 05:50 PM PST

Ingestible Device Takes Vitals For Remote Analysis

WRITTEN BY: Abbie Arce

May the doctors of the future be able to take your vital signs remotely? That is the suggestion made by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) ingestible electronic device.

This device is intended to take readings like heart rate, breathing rate and core temperature via a device about the size of an almond. The device is made from all FDA approved materials and is safe for ingestion.

After identifying components that could be ingested, researchers designed the device using tiny microphones. These listening devices are similar to the ones used in cell phones. They allow medical professionals to extract heart and breathing data without ever touching the patient.

Taking vitals remotely can help be helpful for patients whom touching would not be ideal, such as, patients with burns covering much of their body.

In the above video, from MIT news, Albert Swiston and Giovanni Traverso discuss the device and its development.

 

Sources: MIT News

About the Author
  • Abbie is an AFAA certified personal trainer and fitness instructor with an interest in all things health-science. She has recently graduated with her BS in Applied Sport and Exercise Science from Barry University. Next, she intends to earn an MPH with a focus in Epidemiology.
You May Also Like
NOV 26, 2018
Cardiology
NOV 26, 2018
Can beet juice 'de-stiffen' the arteries?
If you’ve been drinking beet juice before going to the gym, the results of a new study may surprise you.   Image Credit: "beet juice"...
NOV 21, 2018
Cardiology
NOV 21, 2018
What We Know About Kawasaki Disease
Kawasaki disease discovered by Dr. Tomisaku Kawasaki, a Japanese pediatrician, is a rare type of vasculitis, or inflammation of the blood vessels. It&rsquo...
DEC 08, 2018
Cardiology
DEC 08, 2018
Atrial Fibrillation, Explained
Atrial fibrillation (A-Fib) is a term you've likely heard before. You may have even been told you live with A-Fib. What exactly is this common type of...
FEB 07, 2019
Cardiology
FEB 07, 2019
Cardiovascular Risks Linked To Excessive Weight In Infancy
New research, from the University of Sydney, found excessive weight gain in children under two can lead to cardiovascular risk factors in teenage years.&nb...
FEB 11, 2019
Cardiology
FEB 11, 2019
MRI Possible Alternative To Commonly Used Heart Imaging
Although it has been slow to catch on, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize heart function may soon be the preferred option. This is be...
FEB 27, 2019
Immunology
FEB 27, 2019
Having Heart Valve Issues?
UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves....
Loading Comments...