JAN 19, 2016 2:27 PM PST

Physical Exercise: A Spectrum of Health Benefits

WRITTEN BY: Kara Marker


You don’t have to be a marathon runner in order to benefit from physical exercise, a new study says. Even small amounts of exercise like taking a lap around the office a couple of times during the day could lower your risk of cardiovascular disease.
 
From the Journal of the American College of Cardiology  (JACC), scientists conducted a new study looking at the spectrum of physical activity and how it benefits human health in different ways.
 
"The greatest benefit is to simply exercise,” JACC Editor-in-Chief Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, said.
 
Scientists considered both volume and intensity of aerobic exercise in this study. They found that moderate and vigorous exercise decreased the risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition, the researchers believe their analysis shows that the risks from overexertion during exercise are outweighed by the benefits exercise provides for human health.
 
Michael Scott Emery, M.D., co-chair of the ACC Sports and Exercise Cardiology Council, believes the media has “embraced the idea that exercise may harm the heart and disseminated this message, thereby diverting attention away from the benefits of exercise as a potent intervention for heart disease.”
 
The new study aims to promote physical activity as a key factor for cardiovascular health, and the question of “how much is too much” has yet to be answered. What scientists do know, though, is that by taking a short jog, by walking the dog, or by jumping on the treadmill while you watch the news, you can reduce your risk of developing cardiovascular disease – a condition that kills more people in the United States than anything else.
 

Source: American College of Cardiology
 
About the Author
  • I am a scientific journalist and enthusiast, especially in the realm of biomedicine. I am passionate about conveying the truth in scientific phenomena and subsequently improving health and public awareness. Sometimes scientific research needs a translator to effectively communicate the scientific jargon present in significant findings. I plan to be that translating communicator, and I hope to decrease the spread of misrepresented scientific phenomena! Check out my science blog: ScienceKara.com.
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