APR 21, 2018 09:57 AM PDT

Scientists Recommend Exercise After A Heart Attack

WRITTEN BY: Kara Marker

Doctors recommend regular physical activity to reduce the risk of a heart attack, but the same advice applies even after a person has a heart attack. A new study from a collaboration between the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences and Gothenburg University shows that regular exercise after a heart attack reduces the risk of death by 50 percent.

The new study provides evidence for healthcare professionals to recommend to their heart attack patients to exercise regularly even after the attack, similarly to the way doctors would recommend smoking cessation, healthy eating, and avoiding stress.

"It is well known that physically active people are less likely to have a heart attack and more likely to live longer," explained lead author Dr Örjan Ekblom. "However, we did not know the impact of exercise on people after a heart attack."

Every year, 735,000 Americans have a heart attack, and heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women worldwide.

The new study included 22,227 heart attack patients who reported their physical activity once between six and ten weeks after the attack and once one year after the attack. The survey asked the patient how many times they had exercised for 30 minutes or longer during the previous week. Based on their responses, patients were divided into four different groups: constantly inactive, reduced activity, increased activity, and constantly active.

Researchers found that the risk of death was 37 percent lower for patients in the reduced activity category, 51 percent lower for increased activity, and 59 percent lower for constantly active, all compared to patients in the constantly inactive category. Just over one thousand patients died during an average follow-up of 4.2 years.

"Our study shows that patients can reduce their risk of death by becoming physically active after a heart attack,” Ekblom explained. “Patients who reported being physically active 6 to 10 weeks after the heart attack but became inactive afterwards seem to have a carry-over benefit. But of course the benefits for active people are even greater if they remain physically active."

In the future, Ekblom and his team plan on further identifying specific types of physical activity that would be most beneficial for heart attack survivors, whether it be resistance exercise, aerobic training, or a combination of the two.

Sources: European Society of Cardiology, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

About the Author
  • I am a scientific journalist and enthusiast, especially in the realm of biomedicine. I am passionate about conveying the truth in scientific phenomena and subsequently improving health and public awareness. Sometimes scientific research needs a translator to effectively communicate the scientific jargon present in significant findings. I plan to be that translating communicator, and I hope to decrease the spread of misrepresented scientific phenomena! Check out my science blog: ScienceKara.com.
You May Also Like
MAY 25, 2018
Cardiology
MAY 25, 2018
Oily Fish Maintains Heart Health, Reduces Risk of Complications
U.S. doctors have confirmed that eating at least two servings of oily fish per week is enough to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Oily fish ca...
JUN 01, 2018
Cardiology
JUN 01, 2018
Walk for Your Life
How fast do you walk? Walking faster could help you live longer, a new study shows, especially for older people and for people at a risk of heart disease....
JUN 05, 2018
Cardiology
JUN 05, 2018
Your Heart and Your Sleeping Habits
Getting enough sleep is good for you. Old news, right? A new study from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine expands on this generic health advice, findi...
JUN 15, 2018
Cardiology
JUN 15, 2018
Red Meat Allergy Causes Heart Disease
For people with an uncommon sensitivity to a particular carbohydrate in red meat, the risk of heart disease is elevated when consumed. From the National He...
JUN 26, 2018
Cardiology
JUN 26, 2018
Micropacemaker Provides New Cardiac Pacing Options
Scientists are working on the world’s first micropacemaker system designed to be implanted in the pericardial sac surrounding the heart. From the Chi...
JUL 18, 2018
Cardiology
JUL 18, 2018
Risk of Heart Attack Rising for Pregnant Women
Recent study shows that rates of heart attack have increased in pregnant women 25% from 2002 to 2014....
Loading Comments...