AUG 28, 2019 7:00 AM PDT

Stealth Drones Made with Self-destructing Material Leave No Trace Behind

WRITTEN BY: Daniel Duan

In the military, gliders are a much-desired method for scouting and stealth operations. But when they become captured or accidentally crash during a mission, these devices can be taken apart, revealing intelligence or technology-related information to the enemy.

A team of material scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a self-destructing polymer that spontaneously disintegrates upon exposure to sunlight or artificial light. They embedded the polymer with a photo-activating catalyst that promotes depolymerization. What's more, by adding different additives, the researchers can make it rigid (good for gliders or sensors), or elastic (suited for the fabric of parachutes).

Military applications aside, it will be interesting to see if this self-destructing polymer finds its way to civilian uses, as an alternative material to produce any single-use plastic items.

This work will be presented at an American Chemical Society (ACS) meeting later this week.

Source: ACS via Youtube

Featured image: Pixabay

About the Author
  • Graduated with a bachelor degree in Pharmaceutical Science and a master degree in neuropharmacology, Daniel is a radiopharmaceutical and radiobiology expert based in Ottawa, Canada. With years of experience in biomedical R&D, Daniel is very into writing. He is constantly fascinated by what's happening in the world of science. He hopes to capture the public's interest and promote scientific literacy with his trending news articles. The recurring topics in his Chemistry & Physics trending news section include alternative energy, material science, theoretical physics, medical imaging, and green chemistry.
You May Also Like
DEC 14, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
Using AI to classify data from solar images
DEC 14, 2020
Using AI to classify data from solar images
New research describes how scientists from the University of Graz, the Kanzelhöhe Solar Observatory (Austria), and ...
JAN 10, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Documenting biological magnetoreception in living cells
JAN 10, 2021
Documenting biological magnetoreception in living cells
New research published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from a team of scientists fr ...
JAN 23, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Exploring ceramic omnidirectional bioprinting in cell-suspensions
JAN 23, 2021
Exploring ceramic omnidirectional bioprinting in cell-suspensions
A new technique known as ceramic omnidirectional bioprinting in cell-suspensions (COBICS) may allow surgeons of the futu ...
MAR 04, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
The magic vibrational powers of frog lungs
MAR 04, 2021
The magic vibrational powers of frog lungs
Ever tried picking someone up at a loud, crowded bar? It’s not easy – not only may they not hear your fabulo ...
APR 14, 2021
Cannabis Sciences
Why Delta-8-THC is Different to Regular THC
APR 14, 2021
Why Delta-8-THC is Different to Regular THC
In recent months, a cannabinoid known as delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has increased in popularity. While similar t ...
APR 14, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Amping up the fight against superbugs with black phosphorus
APR 14, 2021
Amping up the fight against superbugs with black phosphorus
A research team from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, has devised an ultra-thin 2D antimicrobial coating that co ...
Loading Comments...