JAN 19, 2016 11:49 PM PST

Pull very fast and graphene paper gets brittle

Plasticity is the ability of a material to permanently deform when strained. Researchers, thinking about future things like flexible electronics, decided to see how graphene oxide “paper” would handle shear strain, in which the sheets are pulled by the ends.

Their tests show that random molecules scattered within layers of otherwise pristine graphene affect how the layers interact with each other under strain.
 
"These structures could be a thermal substrate for electronic devices, they could be filters, they could be sensors, or they could be biomedical devices," says Chandra Sekhar Tiwary. "But if we're going to use a material, we need to understand how it behaves."

Such knowledge is important when making novel advanced materials, says Chandra Sekhar Tiwary, a lead author of the new paper in Nano Letters and a Rice University postdoctoral research associate.
“We want to build three-dimensional structures from two-dimensional materials, so this kind of study is useful,” he says. “These structures could be a thermal substrate for electronic devices, they could be filters, they could be sensors, or they could be biomedical devices.

“But if we’re going to use a material, we need to understand how it behaves.

The graphene oxide paper they tested was a stack of sheets that lay atop each other like pancakes. Oxygen molecules “functionalized” the surfaces, adding roughness to the otherwise atom-thick sheets.

In experiments and computer models, the team found that with gentle, slow stress, the oxides would indeed catch, causing the paper to take on a corrugated form where layers pulled apart. But a higher strain rate makes the material brittle.

“The simulation performed by our collaborators in Brazil provides insight and confirms that if you pull it very fast, the layers don’t interact, and only one layer comes out,” Tiwary says.

“After this study, we now know there are some functional groups that are useful and some that are not. With this understanding we can choose the functional groups to make better structures at the molecular level.”

Other researchers from Rice and the State University of Campinas, Brazil collaborated on the project, which received support from the Department of Defense and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

This article was originally published on futurity.org.
About the Author
  • Futurity features the latest discoveries by scientists at top research universities in the US, UK, Canada, Europe, Asia, and Australia. The nonprofit site, which launched in 2009, is supported solely by its university partners (listed below) in an effort to share research news directly with the public.
You May Also Like
MAR 16, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Is your air purifier making your air more polluted?
MAR 16, 2021
Is your air purifier making your air more polluted?
A study from a collaboration of researchers at Illinois Tech, Portland State University, and Colorado State University h ...
MAR 24, 2021
Space & Astronomy
Molecules Containing Carbon Found in Space
MAR 24, 2021
Molecules Containing Carbon Found in Space
It's thought that most carbon found in space is contained in big molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ( ...
APR 14, 2021
Cannabis Sciences
Why Delta-8-THC is Different to Regular THC
APR 14, 2021
Why Delta-8-THC is Different to Regular THC
In recent months, a cannabinoid known as delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has increased in popularity. While similar t ...
MAY 03, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
What do advances in 3D printing techniques mean for tissue engineering?
MAY 03, 2021
What do advances in 3D printing techniques mean for tissue engineering?
New investigations into the field of customized tissue engineering are reported in the journal Bioprinting. The study wa ...
MAY 18, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
What's all the fuss about diamonds, anyway?
MAY 18, 2021
What's all the fuss about diamonds, anyway?
You might only think of rings and bling when you think of diamonds, but in fact, there are a whole lot more uses for dia ...
JUN 23, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Could willow trees filter wastewater and untreated sewage?
JUN 23, 2021
Could willow trees filter wastewater and untreated sewage?
A new study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment demonstrates the potential of willow tree roots to ...
Loading Comments...