APR 25, 2018 10:53 AM PDT

What's Behind the Blast of Supernova

The death of a star can sometimes be very explosive. One can see a series of blindingly bright bursts into view in the night sky when this happens. The brilliant point of light is the explosion of a star that has reached the end of its life, otherwise known as a supernova.

Supernovae can briefly outshine entire galaxies and radiate more energy than our sun will in its entire lifetime. They are considered "the largest explosion that takes place in space."

A star can go supernova either by sucking up mass from a nearby neighboring star until a runaway nuclear reaction ignites, or running out of its fusion fuel and collapses under its gravity.

Scientists have long suspected that neutrinos, the elusive, ghost-like particles, might be the trigger for supernovae's final big bang. But they have not been able to prove this hypothesis. 

With advances in computing power and three-dimensional simulation, astronomers believe that they are closing in on unraveling the complex physics behind the blasts.

Source: Nature Video via Youtube

About the Author
  • Graduated with a bachelor degree in Pharmaceutical Science and a master degree in neuropharmacology, Daniel is a radiopharmaceutical and radiobiology expert based in Ottawa, Canada. With years of experience in biomedical R&D, Daniel is very into writing. He is constantly fascinated by what's happening in the world of science. He hopes to capture the public's interest and promote scientific literacy with his trending news articles. The recurring topics in his Chemistry & Physics trending news section include alternative energy, material science, theoretical physics, medical imaging, and green chemistry.
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