JAN 24, 2016 7:07 AM PST

Genetic ‘Fingerprint' Predicts IVF Failure

WRITTEN BY: Xuan Pham
Genetic test reveals whether IVF will work

For women who have trouble conceiving naturally, assisted reproductive techniques like in vitro fertilization (IVF) can be life changing. But despite these interventions, doctors wondered why some women still fail to become pregnant, even with a healthy embryo is present. A recent study shows that this failure to conceive may be due to specific genetic “fingerprints” from the womb.
 
The current success rate of IVF treatments that result in pregnancy stands at a paltry 35%. Many women go through multiple rounds of IVF only to be disappointed. And until now, doctors had no knowledge of the biological factors that influence IVF success and failure.
 
As it turns out, every woman has carries a genetic signature that pre-determines whether IVF treatments will be successful.
 
The genetic “fingerprint” comes from a study that compared biopsies from womb linings of 43 women with recurrent implantation failure, and 72 women who gave birth after fertility treatment. Genetic analysis of the biopsies showed an abnormal gene expression profile for 303 genes in the lining of the womb for 80% of women with IVF failure. This genetic signature predicts IVF failure with 100% positive predictive value, as the pattern is completely absent in women whose fertility treatment resulted in births.
 
The researchers noted that “a specific gene 'fingerprint', when present, is always associated with failure, which is very significant in aiding our understanding of IVF failure."
 
The research findings could shape how doctors will counsel their patients about the fertility treatments. Before, doctors were in the dark about the relative chance of success for each of their patients. Now, however, doctors could predict whether a woman is likely to achieve conception with IVF by assessing her genetic profile. For example, women who carry the genetic signatures associated with IVF failures could be counseled on their risks and be spared the heartache of repeated failures. Knowing the odds will allow both women and their doctors to make better informed choices about whether to pursue IVF.

While we believe this finding to be a very significant development in international fertility research, the next stage is to trial it as a clinical test to study its effectiveness on a wider scale. - Nick Macklon, study co-lead, chair in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Southampton.


Additional Source: EurekAlert
About the Author
  • I am a human geneticist, passionate about telling stories to make science more engaging and approachable. Find more of my writing at the Hopkins BioMedical Odyssey blog and at TheGeneTwist.com.
You May Also Like
SEP 20, 2019
Neuroscience
SEP 20, 2019
The brain of a psychopath: how people with psychopathic traits control their 'dark urges'
Psychopaths are usually portrayed negatively: they display antisocial behavior, such as shallow emotions, callousness, impulsivity, and lack of empathy. Ps...
SEP 26, 2019
Clinical & Molecular DX
SEP 26, 2019
The Invisible Killers in Your Home
Do you know a mist of air freshener or the burning of a deliciously-scented candle in your home is a "sweet" and a slow poison to you and your loved ones....
OCT 09, 2019
Neuroscience
OCT 09, 2019
Elderly Depression Remains Consistant As Antidepressant Use Doubles
  A new study from the University of East Anglia finds that despite a 2-fold increase in antidepressant use, depression among individuals 65 and older...
NOV 26, 2019
Cannabis Sciences
NOV 26, 2019
Cannabis Provides Relief from Headache and Migraine Pain
Innovative technology allowed researchers to conduct the first-ever study of cannabis use for the treatment of headache and migraine pain in real-time. Wit...
DEC 11, 2019
Health & Medicine
DEC 11, 2019
Can optical illusions help diagnose autism?
At first glance what do you see -- a young woman? Or perhaps a smooth jazz artist? This classic optical illusion occurs due to a phenomenon known as binocu...
FEB 21, 2020
Clinical & Molecular DX
FEB 21, 2020
Diagnosing COVID-19
Diagnosing coronavirus is done through next-generation sequencing, real-time RT-PCR tests, cell culture, and electron miscopy. For patients, that translate...
Loading Comments...