MAY 21, 2019 11:48 PM PDT

New Viable Drug Target for Prostate Cancer

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

In the research community, MYC is historically known to be a difficult oncogene to target in cancer therapy. However, a recent study in the Journal of Cell Biology has found that an enzyme called PHLPP2 can serve as a potential route to target the MYC gene.

Histology slide of prostate cancer showing both benign glands and prostate carcinoma. Credit: Oncolex.org

"Now, we have a new way of getting at this old foe in cancer research," said Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) researcher Lloyd Trotman, who was focused on a cure for prostate cancer--one of the most prevalent cancers among men and the second leading cause of cancer death in American men.

Prostate cancer can metastasize to other parts of the body and patients with metastatic cancer have a much-reduced rate of survival than if the cancer was contained in the organ.

Now the study, co-led by Dr. Trotman and Dr. Dawid Nowak, an assistant professor at Weill Cornell and a former postdoctoral fellow at the Trotman lab, was able to examine the natural process of prostate cancer metastasis in mice and how to halt these processes by deleting the PHLPP2 enzyme.

The PHLPP2 enzyme is a critical protein in a signal pathway implicated in cell growth and survival in response to extracellular communications and signal relays. For prostate cancer, PHLPP2 cause the progression and later metastasis because it stabilizes and supports the MYC oncogene. Thus, blocking PHLPP2 can be proven as a viable drug target for the treatment of prostate cancer as it can halt the progression of cancer growth and metastasis. In addition, deleting the enzyme didn't show any symptoms of toxicity in mice or human cells.

Source: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

About the Author
BS/MS
Nouran is a scientist, educator, and life-long learner with a passion for making science more communicable. When not busy in the lab isolating blood macrophages, she enjoys writing on various STEM topics.
You May Also Like
JUN 06, 2022
Microbiology
Light-Activated Nanoscale Drills Can Penetrate Bacteria
JUN 06, 2022
Light-Activated Nanoscale Drills Can Penetrate Bacteria
In 1999, a miniature rotor that could be moved reliably was attached to a molecule. Researchers have come a long way sin ...
JUN 20, 2022
Health & Medicine
In a Small Study, Experimental Immunotherapy Drug for Rectal Cancer has a High Success Rate
JUN 20, 2022
In a Small Study, Experimental Immunotherapy Drug for Rectal Cancer has a High Success Rate
The New England Journal of Medicine published results from a small study by researchers at New York’s Memorial Slo ...
JUN 29, 2022
Microbiology
Unleashing the Genetic Power of Ocean Microbes
JUN 29, 2022
Unleashing the Genetic Power of Ocean Microbes
By analyzing over 1,000 samples of the marine environment, researchers have reconstructed the genomes of 25,000 novel mi ...
JUL 11, 2022
Cancer
Boosting CAR T Cell Therapy with TIGIT Blockade
JUL 11, 2022
Boosting CAR T Cell Therapy with TIGIT Blockade
Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T Cell therapy has emerged as a promising immunotherapeutic approach to treat blood canc ...
JUL 16, 2022
Drug Discovery & Development
Oxytocin Nasal Sprays Don't Improve Emotion Recognition in Healthy Individuals
JUL 16, 2022
Oxytocin Nasal Sprays Don't Improve Emotion Recognition in Healthy Individuals
Oxytocin nasal sprays do not improve the recognition of emotions such as anger and sadness in healthy men without autism ...
JUL 20, 2022
Neuroscience
Stress Transmitter Wakes Up the Sleeping Brain Over 100 Times Per Night
JUL 20, 2022
Stress Transmitter Wakes Up the Sleeping Brain Over 100 Times Per Night
A study published in Nature Neuroscience reported that the stress hormone and transmitter noradrenaline wakes up the hum ...
Loading Comments...