DEC 18, 2019 11:24 AM PST

A tool that simplifies the hunt for cancer drugs

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Cells have long been the internal hubs for proteins that hold a wide variety of unique functions. Disorders on how a cell synthesizes a protein can affect a lot of our physiology and predispose to a multitude of symptoms leading to a diseases such as cancer. In fact, many drugs are developed to target a protein responsible for a particular disorder.

Learn more about protein synthesis:

Scientists curious about which drugs affect what kinds of proteins may now have a tool that can determine exactly that. Specifically, scientists at Karolinska Institutet have now utilized these methods to generate a tool that can produce reliable and precise results. They developed the tool through testing lung and breast cancer and intestinal tumor cells with 56 different kinds of drugs. For each drug compound, they first determined the dose that kills half of the cells after 48 hours (LC50) and then used that dose on all other drugs.

The tool is referred to as the ‘ProTargetMiner’.

Findings of the study were published in Nature Communications and describes that when half of the cells die, each proteome (a structure in the cell in which proteins are present) will show which and what proteins were targeted by an added drug. Results of experiments are made available through an online database and researchers are hopeful to expand their database through continues studies.

"We find that the cells are killed in different ways by different drugs," says Roman Zubarev, professor of medical proteomics at Karolinska Institutet. "Not so long ago we used to think that cells could only die in three ways -- necrosis, apoptosis or autophagy -- but now we've observed at least thirteen different ways in which cells can die. This method can help to speed up certain parts of the process of new drug development or improve our understanding of existing drugs."

Source: Science Daily

About the Author
  • Nouran is a scientist, educator, and life-long learner with a passion for making science more communicable. When not busy in the lab isolating blood macrophages, she enjoys writing on various STEM topics.
You May Also Like
JAN 22, 2021
Drug Discovery & Development
Treating NF1: Investigational Drug Shows Positive Results
JAN 22, 2021
Treating NF1: Investigational Drug Shows Positive Results
From preclinical studies, researchers have found that an investigational drug called ‘cabozantinib’ can trea ...
JAN 24, 2021
Drug Discovery & Development
Finding New Cancer Drugs
JAN 24, 2021
Finding New Cancer Drugs
Cells in our body share the same genes. But how those genes are expressed can dictate the fate of a cell. For ...
JAN 28, 2021
Immunology
Killers With a Hit on the Spike
JAN 28, 2021
Killers With a Hit on the Spike
Natural killer cells, or NK cells, are specialized immune cells of the innate immune system. Their job revolves around e ...
MAR 21, 2021
Microbiology
Potent Drug Rapidly Clears Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea in Mouse Model
MAR 21, 2021
Potent Drug Rapidly Clears Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea in Mouse Model
A mouse model has shown that it's possible to clear a multi-drug resistant gonorrhea with only one dose of antibioti ...
MAR 30, 2021
Drug Discovery & Development
Common Alzheimer's Drugs Reduce Mortality Rate and Cognitive Decline
MAR 30, 2021
Common Alzheimer's Drugs Reduce Mortality Rate and Cognitive Decline
Researchers from the Karolinska Institute and Umea University in Sweden have found that a commonly recommended group of ...
MAY 14, 2021
Health & Medicine
A National Standard THC Dose for Researchers is Here
MAY 14, 2021
A National Standard THC Dose for Researchers is Here
    Whatever your stance on cannabis, almost  everyone would agree that more, better quality, research sh ...
Loading Comments...