MAY 04, 2020 2:33 PM PDT

Predicting ocean acidification five years in the future

Research published recently in Nature Communications offers a new tool to predict ocean acidity years in the future. While previous studies have been able to do this a few months out, this method could help fisheries forecast ocean acidification up to five years in the future in real-time in order to better adapt to changing conditions. 

"We've taken a climate model and run it like you would have a weather forecast, essentially - and the model included ocean chemistry, which is extremely novel," reports Riley Brady, the lead author of the study and a doctoral candidate in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at CU Boulder.

"Here, you've got physics, chemistry, and biology all connecting to create extremely profitable fisheries, from crabs all the way up to big fish," said Brady. "Making predictions of future environmental conditions one, two, or even three years out is remarkable because this is the kind of information that fisheries managers could utilize."

This study looked at the California Current System that goes from Baja California in Mexico up Canada and is responsible for a billion-dollar fisheries industry. Using historical forecasts from a climate model from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the researchers developed a model to predict ocean acidity in the future. The urgency of this development is not unnoticed, say the researchers. 

"Ocean acidification is proceeding at a rate 10 times faster today than any time in the last 55 million years. We expect people in communities who rely on the ocean ecosystem for fisheries, for tourism, and for food security to be affected by ocean acidification," said study co-author Nicole Lovenduski, associate professor in atmospheric and oceanic sciences.

"In the last decade, people have already found evidence of ocean acidification in the California current," concludes Brady. "It's here right now, and it's going to be here and ever-present in the next couple of decades."

Sources: Nature Communications, Eureka Alert

About the Author
  • Kathryn is a curious world-traveller interested in the intersection between nature, culture, history, and people. She has worked for environmental education non-profits and is a Spanish/English interpreter.
You May Also Like
JUN 16, 2020
Earth & The Environment
The pros and cons of agroforestry
JUN 16, 2020
The pros and cons of agroforestry
Research published in the journal Conservation Letters highlights the importance of considering land-use history when ev ...
JUN 18, 2020
Neuroscience
How Climate Change Worsened Zika Virus Defects
JUN 18, 2020
How Climate Change Worsened Zika Virus Defects
Image: Pixabay   In 2015 a massive outbreak of the Zika virus started in Brazil and spread across 33 countries. The ...
JUL 06, 2020
Earth & The Environment
The story behind a soil
JUL 06, 2020
The story behind a soil
Soil scientist Karen Vaughan from the University of Wyoming knows how to classify a soil well. There’s a science t ...
JUL 23, 2020
Earth & The Environment
Climate change hastens erosion in rivers
JUL 23, 2020
Climate change hastens erosion in rivers
A study published earlier this week in Nature Geoscience from a collaboration of scientists from the U.S. Geological Sur ...
SEP 01, 2020
Earth & The Environment
Coral reefs diagnosed with osteoporosis
SEP 01, 2020
Coral reefs diagnosed with osteoporosis
New research published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters contemplates the impact that ocean acidification ...
SEP 04, 2020
Microbiology
Researchers Discover a Way to Use Microbes to Help Make Plastic
SEP 04, 2020
Researchers Discover a Way to Use Microbes to Help Make Plastic
Researchers have discovered that some bacteria can make ethylene in a way we never knew about; microbes that metabolize ...
Loading Comments...