APR 22, 2015 08:08 PM PDT

Chinese Scientists Genetically Altered Human Embryos

WRITTEN BY: Judy O'Rourke
Results published in Protein & Cell, an open access journal, confirm rumors that Chinese scientists have edited genomes of human embryos, a contentious effort and a first worldwide.

Their efforts have been covered in an article titled "Chinese scientists genetically modify human embryos," in the April 22 issue of the journal Nature.

Junjiu Huang, PhD, gene-function researcher, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, led the research team, which sought to allay concerns about their work by noting they used ‘nonviable' embryos from fertility clinics-which could not culminate in a live birth.

Employing CRISPR/Cas9, a gene-editing technique, the Chinese researchers tried to alter a gene that causes a blood disorder that can be deadly.

The piece in Nature discusses the paper from Huang's team, and the debate surrounding human-embryo editing. It notes that Huang says his team's paper was rejected by the journals Nature and Science, in part because of ethical objections.

A source noted that Huang's team is not the only one in China working on gene editing in human embryos.

[Source: Nature]
About the Author
  • Judy O'Rourke worked as a newspaper reporter before becoming chief editor of Clinical Lab Products magazine. As a freelance writer today, she is interested in finding the story behind the latest developments in medicine and science, and in learning what lies ahead.
You May Also Like
DEC 07, 2019
Genetics & Genomics
DEC 07, 2019
Super-Resolution Microscopy Reveals How DNA Damage is Repaired
People that don't carry functional copies of these proteins are more likely to get diseases that arise from unstable DNA....
DEC 07, 2019
Genetics & Genomics
DEC 07, 2019
Familial Alzheimer's Gene Found to Regulate Nerve Development
An international team of scientists has now identified a process that plays a critical role in the growth of one part of neurons, the axon....
DEC 07, 2019
Genetics & Genomics
DEC 07, 2019
Plants Moved to Land by Stealing Genes from Soil Bacteria
Algae were the first pants on earth, and they lived underwater. How they managed to move onto land was largely a mystery, until now. By studying the genome...
DEC 07, 2019
Cell & Molecular Biology
DEC 07, 2019
Linking Intestinal Stem Cells with Increased Cancer Risk From a High-Fat Diet
The work, which used a mouse model, links stem cell activity with cellular fat consumption in a new way....
DEC 07, 2019
Neuroscience
DEC 07, 2019
ADHD and Autism Share the Same Genes
In the US, 1 in every 59 children has autism, with 1 in every 20 having ADHD. Now, researchers from Denmark’s national psychiatric project, iPSYCH, h...
DEC 07, 2019
Genetics & Genomics
DEC 07, 2019
A New Tool for Evaluating Millions of Genetic Sequences at Once
Gene sequencing technologies have created a wealth of data, and scientists can now do more with all that information....
Loading Comments...