APR 22, 2015 4:45 PM PDT

Somber Anniversary: 100 Years of Chemical Weapons

WRITTEN BY: Judy O'Rourke

April 22, 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the first large-scale use of chemical weapons in modern warfare. Some of the best minds in chemistry at that time, including a Nobel Prize winner, used their knowledge of science to build humanity's new weapons of mass destruction. This week, we take a sobering look at the chemistry behind the modern world's first chemical weapons. [Source: The American Chemical Society]
About the Author
  • Judy O'Rourke worked as a newspaper reporter before becoming chief editor of Clinical Lab Products magazine. As a freelance writer today, she is interested in finding the story behind the latest developments in medicine and science, and in learning what lies ahead.
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