MAY 26, 2019 5:20 PM PDT

Glue, It's What Keeps A Heart Together

WRITTEN BY: Abbie Arce

If you’ve ever had a cavity filled at the dentist, you know the steps. First goes in the filling, followed by a wand of UV light to harden the material. Well, now a similar process may be coming to the world of cardiology. 

Scientists at Harvard University have developed an ultraviolet light activated glue, much like a liquid Band-Aid, that can be used to repair wounds in the heart.

This material might someday replace the use of staples and sutures in heart surgeries. One of the main benefits of this invention is that these materials can later be absorbed by the body, much unlike their predecessors. A second benefit is that unlike sutures, these do not need to be realigned throughout the healing process.

In researching similar products in China, scientists found no leaks between heart tissue and the glue. They also found about 80% of the gel would biodegrade after eight weeks when injected under the skin of rats. Additionally, no adverse reaction to the glue was visible.

The above video from HuffPost Live goes into detail about the adhesive and its benefits. 

 

 

Sources: HuffPostNational Institutes of Health

About the Author
  • Abbie is an AFAA certified personal trainer and fitness instructor with an interest in all things health-science. She has recently graduated with her BS in Applied Sport and Exercise Science from Barry University in Miami. Next, she intends to earn an MPH with a focus in Epidemiology.
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