MAY 26, 2019 5:20 PM PDT

Glue, It's What Keeps A Heart Together

WRITTEN BY: Abbie Arce

If you’ve ever had a cavity filled at the dentist, you know the steps. First goes in the filling, followed by a wand of UV light to harden the material. Well, now a similar process may be coming to the world of cardiology. 

Scientists at Harvard University have developed an ultraviolet light activated glue, much like a liquid Band-Aid, that can be used to repair wounds in the heart.

This material might someday replace the use of staples and sutures in heart surgeries. One of the main benefits of this invention is that these materials can later be absorbed by the body, much unlike their predecessors. A second benefit is that unlike sutures, these do not need to be realigned throughout the healing process.

In researching similar products in China, scientists found no leaks between heart tissue and the glue. They also found about 80% of the gel would biodegrade after eight weeks when injected under the skin of rats. Additionally, no adverse reaction to the glue was visible.

The above video from HuffPost Live goes into detail about the adhesive and its benefits. 

 

 

Sources: HuffPostNational Institutes of Health

About the Author
  • Abbie is an AFAA certified personal trainer and fitness instructor with an interest in all things health-science. She has recently graduated with her BS in Applied Sport and Exercise Science from Barry University in Miami. Next, she intends to earn an MPH with a focus in Epidemiology.
You May Also Like
JUL 14, 2020
Clinical & Molecular DX
The Smell of Rotten Fish Could Help Predict the Recovery of Unresponsive Patients
JUL 14, 2020
The Smell of Rotten Fish Could Help Predict the Recovery of Unresponsive Patients
A study published in the journal Nature provides new evidence supporting an unconventional test to map recovery paths of ...
JUL 12, 2020
Cardiology
A Beneficial Microbe Can Reduce the Risk of Artery Disease
JUL 12, 2020
A Beneficial Microbe Can Reduce the Risk of Artery Disease
Trillions of microbes call our bodies home, and the ones that live in the gut can have a powerful impact on human health ...
JUL 12, 2020
Cell & Molecular Biology
Lung Cancer is Different in Non-Smokers
JUL 12, 2020
Lung Cancer is Different in Non-Smokers
Not everyone that gets lung cancer is a current or former smoker, and researchers have now found that lung cancer is dif ...
JUL 16, 2020
Cardiology
A New Drug Candidate to Combat Cardiac Fibrosis
JUL 16, 2020
A New Drug Candidate to Combat Cardiac Fibrosis
Medicine is undoubtedly reaching a golden age, as researchers expand diagnostic and therapeutic tools like never before. ...
JUL 23, 2020
Immunology
Cancer Therapy Reduces Lung Scarring
JUL 23, 2020
Cancer Therapy Reduces Lung Scarring
Scientists at the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine have discovered a striking parallel ...
JUL 27, 2020
Microbiology
Vikings Carried, and Helped Spread Smallpox
JUL 27, 2020
Vikings Carried, and Helped Spread Smallpox
A global vaccination effort led to the official eradication of smallpox, but not before it killed over 300 million peopl ...
Loading Comments...