SEP 13, 2019 11:00 AM PDT

The Science of Happiness

WRITTEN BY: Liat Ben-Senior

What is happiness?  People have agonized over this philosophical question for centuries. Scientifically speaking, the answer can be much more straightforward; it is all in your brain. 
Evolutionarily, our brain is programmed that everything that we need for survival will make us feel good, that we avoid pain and seek happiness. Happiness is modulated by seven self-produced neurochemicals; Endocannabinoids, Dopamine, Oxytocin, Endorphin, GABA, Serotonin and Adrenaline.
So, which of these neurotransmitters can you utilize to optimize your happiness? Here's everything you need to know about happiness. 

About the Author
  • Content and marketing professional specializing in the biotech and life sciences industry. My scientific background includes immunology and molecular biology research, both in academia as well as in industry. A constant learner, who is fascinated by the forefront of science. Very excited to join Labroots’ team of writers.
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