APR 16, 2015 11:30 AM PDT

Botox Makes Unnerving Journey into Our Nervous System

WRITTEN BY: Ilene Schneider
New research might bring a frown to even the most heavily botoxed faces, with scientists finding how some of the potent toxin used for cosmetic surgery escapes into the central nervous system.
What effects does Botox have on the central nervous system?
Researchers at The University of Queensland have shown how Botox - also known as Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A - is transported via our nerves back to the central nervous system.

Botox - best known for its ability to smooth wrinkles - has been extremely useful for the treatment of over-active muscles and spasticity as it promotes local and long-term paralysis.

UQ Queensland Brain Institute laboratory leader Professor Frederic Meunier said people had used the deadliest known neurotoxin, Botox, for decades to treat various conditions and for cosmetic purposes.

"The discovery that some of the injected toxin can travel through our nerves is worrying, considering the extreme potency of the toxin," Professor Meunier said.

"However, to this day no unwanted effect attributed to such transport has been reported, suggesting that Botox is safe to use," he said.

"While no side-effects of using Botox medically have been found yet, finding out how this highly active toxin travels to the central nervous system is vital because this pathway is also hijacked by other pathogens such as West Nile or Rabies viruses.

"A detailed understanding of this pathway is likely to lead to new treatments for some of these diseases."

Dr Tong Wang, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Professor Meunier's laboratory, discovered that most of the toxin is transported to a cellular dump where it is meant to be degraded upon reaching the central nervous system.

"For the first time, we've been able to visualise single molecules of Botulinum toxin travelling at high speed through our nerves," Dr Wang said.

"We found that some of the active toxins manage to escape this route and intoxicate neighbouring cells, so we need to investigate this further and find out how."

Botox is derived from naturally-occurring sources in the environment.

The study was a collaboration between scientists at the Queensland Brain Institute, UQ's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, the UQ School of Chemical Engineering, the CSIRO and teams from the United States of America, France and the United Kingdom.

The discovery was made possible through cutting-edge microscopy equipment introduced to Queensland by Professor Meunier through a Queensland International Fellowship award and a Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities grant from the Australian Research Council.

Findings of the research are published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Source: University of Queensland
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
APR 09, 2020
Neuroscience
APR 09, 2020
How Playing the Drums Changes Your Brain
Playing music is associated with a range of neurological benefits from maintaining and improving cognitive abilities to ...
APR 08, 2020
Neuroscience
APR 08, 2020
Study Catalogs Mouse Facial Expressions
It's easy to gauge a dog or cat's emotion by reading their facial expression, but the same has been historically ...
APR 26, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
APR 26, 2020
Does Poor Sleep Lead to Obesity, or is the Opposite True?
For many years, researchers have been aware of the link between obesity and poor sleep or a lack of sleep. But what come ...
APR 26, 2020
Neuroscience
APR 26, 2020
Can you Get PTSD from the COVID-19 Pandemic?
Following a traumatic experience, some experience intense flashbacks, nightmares, irritability, anger and fear. Key symp ...
MAY 12, 2020
Neuroscience
MAY 12, 2020
Is the Brain Hard-Wired for Longing?
Humans and prairie voles are among the 3- 5% of mammalian species that are monogamous. Now, a study looking at prairie v ...
MAY 19, 2020
Neuroscience
MAY 19, 2020
Researchers Find Brain Cells that Shut Down Pain
Researchers at Duke University have found that a small group of cells in the brain may be able to regulate our sense of ...
Loading Comments...