JUL 22, 2019 6:21 PM PDT

Watch This Dive Team Collect a Blood Sample From a Captive Whale Shark

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Getting a blood sample from a massive whale shark can be particularly challenging and would typically require administering an anesthetic to put the animal under and prevent harm to the team. But this aquarium has developed a non-invasive way of gathering a blood sample, and it involves getting the subject used to having a human presence.

In the case of this particular subject, the whale shark was swimming in tight right-handed circles, and the muscles in the left-hand side of its body were beginning to exhibit atrophy. Experts at the facility suggested a blood sample to determine what might have been causing the issue, whether that might have been caused by any sort of internal inflammation, infection, or otherwise.

Upon closer inspection, the aquarium decided to inject the whale shark with a steroid that would combat inflammation, and during the next feed, they saw significant improvements in the animal’s straight-line swimming.

As it would seem, the small blood sample was vital to providing the animal with the proper treatment to recover.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
MAR 08, 2020
Plants & Animals
MAR 08, 2020
Pumas Struggle to Take Down Guanacos
Pumas, like other large cats, are predacious animals that seek large prey capable of sustaining themselves and their cub ...
MAR 22, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
MAR 22, 2020
The Evolutionary Origins of the Human Hand
An ancient fish fossil has given researchers new insight into how fish fins eventually evolved into human hands.
APR 10, 2020
Earth & The Environment
APR 10, 2020
3D Printed Coral Successfully Grows Algae
Corals reefs are revered for their vibrant colors, as well as their ability to create thriving ocean communities. A key ...
APR 26, 2020
Plants & Animals
APR 26, 2020
These Macaques Slap Their Food Scavenging Competition
One thing that lion-tailed macaques and Malabar giant squirrels have in common is a passionate love for the taste of jac ...
MAY 01, 2020
Earth & The Environment
MAY 01, 2020
Small wildfires boost native bee populations
A study from the University of California Riverside suggests that native bee species may thrive from the environmental e ...
MAY 17, 2020
Plants & Animals
MAY 17, 2020
Male Garter Snakes Trick Others to Improve Own Mating Success
After spending several months in hibernation during the winter, male garter snakes emerge from the underground where the ...
Loading Comments...