AUG 10, 2019 08:18 AM PDT

Some People Get Bitten By Mosquitoes More Than Others, and Here's Why

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

If you’ve ever felt like you were a mosquito magnet, then there might be some truth to that sentiment. But despite popular belief, mosquitoes do not prefer males over females, nor do they prefer a certain color hair over others, and there’s especially no truth to the idea that skin color or texture makes you less prone to the mosquito’s infamous proboscis.

Instead, mosquitoes are more likely to discriminate their biting target based on blood type and scent. Studies also show that consuming alcoholic beverages (such as beer) and wearing bright colors can make you more prone to mosquito bites.

Those with O-type blood are purportedly twice as likely to be bitten by mosquitoes than those with A-type or B-type blood. Moreover, enjoyable applied scents such as perfumes and soaps can attract mosquitoes, whereas riper odors (apart from stinky feet) are more likely to repel them.

Another little-known fact is that mosquitoes are attracted to carbon dioxide, which is exhale. As you exercise outside, you emit more carbon dioxide than normal, potentially attracting more mosquitoes in the process.

The next time you consider yourself a mosquito magnet, check to see if you’re avoiding many of these qualities that mosquitoes find attractive.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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