OCT 06, 2019 8:21 AM PDT

These Birds Mate for Life

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Meet the Picathartes, a bird species that resides in the Congo and has done such for more than 44 million years. These birds mate for life, and in order for their relationship to work, both the male and the female must do their part – especially when it comes to their offspring.

In this video, we witness a couple working together to prepare a nest and feed their young. The female seems to be the crafty one in this relationship, building the nest from mud and twigs, while the male falls short in this department.

After laying eggs, the two take turns incubating, spending up to 12 hours each in the beak-crafted nest and keeping the eggs warm and safe. Once the eggs hatch, however, a new challenge arises.

While the male didn’t seem to have crafty qualities about him, he certainly redeemed himself in the scavenging department. The male relentlessly fed the hungry chicks with any and all food he could find, including worms, frogs, and other edible goods.

As it would seem, both the male and the female sported useful skills that they could bring to the table for this relationship to work.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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