MAR 27, 2022 9:30 AM PDT

Genetically-modified Lettuce Could Help Prevent Bone Density Loss in Astronauts

WRITTEN BY: Ryan Vingum

It’s no secret that living in space can take a significant toll on the body. Research suggests that there are a range of health risks posed to humans by long-term habitation and activity in space, including cardiovascular disease, radiation, cognitive and behavioral health changes, physical health deterioration, and inadequate nutrition.

Bone density loss, in particular, is a common problem facing astronauts. In fact, it’s estimated that astronauts could lose up to 2% of their bone density each month in space. 

To address this issue, researchers have grown a genetically modified lettuce that could produce a key drug to help prevent the loss of bone density in astronauts. The research team shared their findings at the recent spring meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Because of gravitational differences in space, bones are under different kinds of pressure. Or rather, less of it. Research suggests that many of the key functions of bones are negatively affected due to the gravitational differences in space, including bones ability to store nutrients and act in a load bearing way. Non-pharmaceutical interventions tend to have only a minimal effect (such as exercise), ultimately leaving astronauts with few options to keep their bones healthy.

One type of pharmaceutical intervention, parathyroid hormone (PTH), has been shown to treat bone density loss in space and maintain adequate bone function. However, that drug would currently need to be injected on a regular basis and available on demand for astronauts.

The genetically-modified lettuce is designed to produce PTH. Specifically, it produces a sort of combination protein, combining PTH with a human protein antibody. The hope is that this combination protein would remain stable and work effectively in the bloodstream. Researchers also hope astronauts could extract the protein from the plant, purify it, and use it as a treatment.  

Admittedly, the lettuce isn’t exactly for eating. However, researchers hope to someday produce the protein so it would be available in oral form, allowing astronauts to get the drug simply by eating the lettuce. 

Sources: Eureka Alert!; Microgravity

About the Author
Professional Writing
Science writer and editor, with a focus on simplifying complex information about health, medicine, technology, and clinical drug development for a general audience.
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