MAR 06, 2016 1:14 PM PST

Anti-poaching Efforts in Africa May Be Paying Off

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Elephants roaming the lands of Africa are always in danger of being met by poachers who want to illegally snag the animals’ valuable ivory tusks for the black market.
 

Efforts to end poaching for elephants in Africa may be paying off, but more needs to be done.


Fortunately, however, the Convention of the Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) notes that elephant numbers in the region are beginning to stabilize.
 
Although the number of poached elephants in the region is still grossly high (over 14,000 recorded deaths in 2015 alone), an increase in the elephant population for the fourth year in a row illustrates that they’re reproducing slightly faster than they’re being poached.
 
The numbers moving in the direction they are also shows that the efforts to stop poachers are effective at helping the elephant species to survive despite the continued hardship for the species.

"African elephant populations continue to face an immediate threat to their survival from unacceptably high levels of poaching for their ivory, especially in Central and West Africa where high levels of poaching are still evident," said John Scanlon, CITES Secretary General.

"There are some encouraging signs, including in certain parts of Eastern Africa, such as in Kenya, where the overall poaching trends have declined, showing us all what is possible through a sustained and collective effort with strong political support."

Despite the positive words from CITES suggesting that poaching has declined in certain regions, poaching is still very much a problem and is a waste of valuable animal life.

The only way to fully defeat poaching is for more local governments to do something about illegal poaching and to help put a stop to it by imposing punishment for being caught in the act. Unfortunately, much of the region remains out of control.

Fortunately, the numbers appear to be moving in the right direction, and as a result, CITES is pushing local governments to enact poaching laws and to enforce them to save the species.

Source: BBC

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
DEC 01, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 01, 2019
Blue Whales Exhibit 'Extremely Low' Heart Rates When Performing Deep Dives
Blue whales have a reputation for being massive, and as far as we know, they’re the largest living animal in existence today. Perhaps unsurprisingly,...
DEC 15, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 15, 2019
For Squirrels, Benefits to Moving Away From Home Are Sex-Dependent
When squirrels grow up, they often face the tough choice of staying at or near the same location where they were born or moving on to bigger and better pla...
JAN 07, 2020
Microbiology
JAN 07, 2020
The Unusual Microbiomes of Bats and Birds
Humans might have a critical dependence on the microbes in their guts, but it seems that not all animals do....
JAN 26, 2020
Plants & Animals
JAN 26, 2020
Iguanas Are Falling From Trees in Florida
The state of Florida has endured an exceptionally chilly Winter season this time around, and some of the state’s wild critters are taking notice. Whi...
FEB 22, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
FEB 22, 2020
Evidence of Resistance to White-Nose Syndrome Appears in Some Bats
A small new study suggests that some bats might be able to resist a devastating fungal disease called white nose syndrome that has destroyed many bat populations....
FEB 24, 2020
Plants & Animals
FEB 24, 2020
These Pelicans Aren't After Fish
Pelicans are seabirds renowned for their unique bills, which encompass a rather discernible throat pouch that makes capturing and swallowing fish a cinch....
Loading Comments...