APR 16, 2016 02:49 PM PDT

WWF Reports First Increase in Wild Tiger Numbers in "Decades"

It wasn’t long ago that scientists started to publicize their predictions that the number of wild tigers on Earth could double by 2022 thanks to increased anti-poaching efforts and new animal tracking technologies.
 

WWF reports increase in tiger population for the first time in decades.


Now, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is reporting the first increase in the number of wild tigers walking the Earth for several decades.
 
“For the first time after decades of constant decline, tiger numbers are on the rise. This offers us great hope and shows that we can save species and their habitats when governments, local communities and conservationists work together,” said Marco Lambertini, Director General of WWF International.
 
The new numbers were achieved via animal population surveys in the areas of Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Russia. The numbers were up to 3890 from 2010’s 3200 figure, which is quite an achievement.
 
Despite the growing numbers, anti-poaching efforts will need to remain strong. The animal’s bones and pelts are incredibly valuable, and if these efforts relax even just a little bit, poachers will keep doing what they do best and the numbers will just fall down again.
 
Because governments have to keep such a firm grip on their tiger populations, new tracking technologies are underway that will help researchers to better map animal populations and to get more accurate numbers.
 
Among these are UAV drones and satellite tracking technologies that could send the antiquated ways of land-spotting back to the days of the cavemen.
 
Tracking technologies will help researchers keep solid tabs on the animals’ whereabouts, while drones will provide a birds-eye view of the animals with clear pictures from above – high enough as not to disturb the animals in their natural habitat as a land survey would.
 
This looks to be a win for tiger preservation efforts, but these efforts will have to remain strong if they are to remain successful.

Source: WWF

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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