MAR 27, 2016 2:54 PM PDT

Drones Could Significantly Improve Environmental Surveys of Wildlife

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or more commonly known as drones, are becoming ever so popular in the modern era. A technology that was originally only available to the military or the wealthy is now becoming a common sight on commercial store shelves.
 
As a result of the widening availability of drones, and as the price on drones continues to drop, their myriads of uses are becoming clearer. Even scientists are finding uses for them throughout the Earthly environment.
 
In a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, University of Adelaide researcher Jarrod Hodgson, and his colleagues, detail how drones can be incredibly useful for surveying different environments to keep track of wildlife populations.
 

Using drones to monitor animal populations may be the wave of the future.


Up in the air, drones give scientists a much more accurate view of large groups of animals than they would have surveying them from the ground. In the research, Hodgson and his colleagues surveyed the grounds of different kinds of sea birds, and consistently found higher numbers of them in UAV-based surveys than they did from ground-based surveys.
 
The evidence suggests that scientists looking to keep track of animal populations will have better and more accurate head counts with UAVs than they will trying to keep count from the ground with binoculars and a pair of human eyes.
 
“The increased count precision afforded by UAVs, along with their ability to survey hard-to-reach populations and places, will likely drive many wildlife monitoring projects that rely on population counts to transition from traditional methods to UAV technology,” the report notes.
 
What’s more is because drones hover high above the environments of these animals, their presence hardly disturbs the animals in their natural habitat like human interference would, and photographs that were captured by the drones were significantly crisper.
 
Although the initial experimentations show UAVs being useful for sighting the populations of sea birds, there’s no reason that the same head-counting methods couldn’t be used across desert plains, forests, and other environment types to keep an eye on different species.

Source: Nature

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
SEP 21, 2021
Cell & Molecular Biology
Single-cell Proteomics Prevails Over DNA and RNA Sequencing
SEP 21, 2021
Single-cell Proteomics Prevails Over DNA and RNA Sequencing
Transcriptomics studies are critical to understanding how biological systems work. However, this technique only estimate ...
AUG 13, 2021
Earth & The Environment
As Above, So Below: Restoring Wetlands and Mapping Watersheds
AUG 13, 2021
As Above, So Below: Restoring Wetlands and Mapping Watersheds
Water is essential for all life on earth, and much of it is stored in wetlands. Biodiversity is high in wetlands, often ...
AUG 30, 2021
Plants & Animals
Using Sunflower Pollen to Create Ink For 3D Biomedical Printing
AUG 30, 2021
Using Sunflower Pollen to Create Ink For 3D Biomedical Printing
Most methods for manufacturing ink for 3D printers involve the addition of various materials to provide strength and str ...
SEP 03, 2021
Technology
Bionic Arm Effective at Restoring "Natural" Arm Function in Amputees
SEP 03, 2021
Bionic Arm Effective at Restoring "Natural" Arm Function in Amputees
A research team at the Cleveland Clinic has developed a new mechanical arm that could help people who have received arm ...
SEP 10, 2021
Health & Medicine
Intervention for Endocarditis- What Kind of Valve is Best?
SEP 10, 2021
Intervention for Endocarditis- What Kind of Valve is Best?
  Infective endocarditis is caused when a bacterium such as staphylococcus enters the bloodstream and infects heart ...
SEP 15, 2021
Plants & Animals
Using Food Waste To Make Rechargeable Batteries
SEP 15, 2021
Using Food Waste To Make Rechargeable Batteries
Back in 2010, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimated that nearly 133 billion pounds of food went to waste, ...
Loading Comments...