JUL 28, 2016 11:58 AM PDT

Study Finds Cloned Animals Don't Live Half-Lives

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

New research into the science of cloning may have debunked the common myth that clones age significantly faster than naturally-born animals and live half-lives.
 

Nine cloned sheep are living normal lives, at their full expectancy.

 Image Credit: University of Nottingham via PBS

The single most significant and well-known clone is Dolly the sheep, which was born with many health issues that made scientists question the humaneness and long-lasting effects of cloning on animals. Dolly was later euthanized so she wouldn’t suffer.
 
Since Dolly, cloning has had a very negative vibe to it, and many scientists don’t even want to touch it because it’s against their beliefs or certain religious groups are just against it entirely.
 
Nevertheless, a recent study performed by the University of Nottingham has been published in the journal Nature Communications, and it reveals that clones probably don’t age any faster than any naturally-born animal.
 
The study involved examining nine other sheep clones, all of which appear to be living completely normal lives for sheep.
 
Despite the fact that they haven’t bred with each other, they do everything normal sheep do including stay outside in the Summers and go inside in the Winters. Their ages range from 6 to 9, and they were all reportedly normal following their own births.
 
This is a huge discovery, as cloning was once thought of as a process that could leave an animal with major health complications and/or a shorter life cycle than a naturally-born version.
 
Cloning is still a very risky business, as cloned animals have to actually survive the state of being an embryo before they are born and then live through the stages of being an infant. Once they grow past their most vulnerable stages, it can be expected that clones will live normal and productive lives.
 
Despite the age myth having been debunked, many are still highly against the concept of cloning.

Nevertheless, the world’s largest cloning plant is being built in China with the intention to break world cloning records and to start commercializing the process, whether for slaughter or for pets.

Source: PBS

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
DEC 13, 2019
Health & Medicine
DEC 13, 2019
Mandatory Warning Labels for California Cannabis Products, Unsafe for Mothers-to-be
As the first state to legalize medical marijuana, California is to date one of the largest cannabis markets in the United States. A nine-member panel of sc...
JAN 26, 2020
Plants & Animals
JAN 26, 2020
Iguanas Are Falling From Trees in Florida
The state of Florida has endured an exceptionally chilly Winter season this time around, and some of the state’s wild critters are taking notice. Whi...
FEB 10, 2020
Plants & Animals
FEB 10, 2020
Mudskippers Aren't Like Most Fish...
Most fish spend almost all of their lives in a body of water, be it the ocean or some smaller lake or stream. Mudskippers, on the other hand, are a unique...
FEB 11, 2020
Plants & Animals
FEB 11, 2020
How the World's Fastest Cat Compares to the World's Fastest Dog
Cheetahs are the world’s fastest land animal; their powerful hind legs give them incredible launching power and their stretchy spines provide a massi...
FEB 13, 2020
Earth & The Environment
FEB 13, 2020
Contamination from Industrial Revolution Discovered in Himalayan Glacier
Scientific studies are revealing just how humans have impacted the environment over the past few centuries. Recently, scientists from Ohio State University...
FEB 17, 2020
Plants & Animals
FEB 17, 2020
How a Spider Builds its Web
Just about everyone has seen a spider web at some point in their life, but have you ever wondered how a spider builds such a strong and perfect web? The pr...
Loading Comments...