NOV 08, 2016 05:40 AM PST

WWF: World Could Witness Up to 2/3 Wildlife Decline by 2020

What is the world going to do about the state of its wildlife? That’s a big question we will have to answer, and fast.
 

Wildlife is on the decline on a global scale, according to the WWF.

 Image Credit: BioVoice

Current models from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) reveal that wildlife populations are on the decline due to major issues like climate change, land development, and illegal hunting. These kinds of actions cause a negative domino effect in the environment.
 
Many animal species rely on other animal species to survive; wild predators rely on specific kinds of prey. The natural equilibrium in our environment is leaning too far in one direction and more needs to be done to stabilize the scales.
 
But climate change isn’t the only problem; illegal hunting, habitat loss, and various other factors also impact our natural environment in negative ways. More animal species are losing footing now than ever, and we continue to bulldoze forests to make room for human city and housing developments. But where does all the wildlife go after that?
 
According to the Living Planet Report released by the WWF, global populations of all kinds of animals ranging from amphibians, to birds, to fish, to mammals, and even to reptiles have been on the decline for decades.
 
Between 1970 and 2012, populations across the board have declined up to 58%, and it’s expected this trend will continue. By as soon as 2016, the 58% figure could grow to over 66%, or more easily referred to as two-thirds.
 
Not only do these numbers appear to illustrate the continuation of our environment swinging into an irreversible imbalance in environmental stability, but the endgame is a world where food and resources are scarce because animals simply have nowhere to live and nothing to eat.

Fortunately, these are jsut predictions and they haven't occurred yet, but they very well could occur if we don't do something about it.
 
Having a world with biodiversity is an important part of what makes Earth function uniquely from other planets, and as we continue to impose on that, we are taking away from the beauty of our planet. Humans are simply over-developing a world in a way that can’t be sustained forever.
 
As wild animal loss continues to reveal its very real risks of extinction in places across the globe, the question becomes, “where do we draw the line?”
 
Limiting development, utilizing cleaner energy sources, recycling harmful materials, and enforcing animal conservation are just some of the things we can do to help the environment and reverse these declining figures.
 
The time to take action is now, as we’re getting dangerously close to a world where wildlife will become just a fairytale that we’ll tell our grandchildren about.
 
Source: WWF, (1 – Full Report), (2 – Summary)

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
SEP 05, 2018
Earth & The Environment
SEP 05, 2018
Climate change increases prevalence of parasites among livestock
A warming climate will ultimately favor some species over others. One such species is a parasite called the liver fluke, which infects livestock with a dis...
SEP 18, 2018
Plants & Animals
SEP 18, 2018
Study Investigates Why People Like Bees and Dislike Wasps
Bees and wasps share a lot in common; the clear majority of both sport the familiar black and yellow color scheme, retain unpleasant stingers for self-defe...
SEP 26, 2018
Plants & Animals
SEP 26, 2018
Climate Change Isn't the Leading Cause of Global Amphibian Decline; Humans Are
Around the globe, amphibians of all types are experiencing sharp population declines. Climate change has long been the primary rationalization for this unf...
OCT 01, 2018
Plants & Animals
OCT 01, 2018
Plants Thicken Their Leaves in Response to High CO2 Levels, and That's Bad
Earth’s plants and animals form a symbiotic relationship. As plants convert atmospheric carbon dioxide into oxygen, animal respiration then turns it...
OCT 22, 2018
Plants & Animals
OCT 22, 2018
Giant Pandas Discern Potential Mates From Their Calls, But Bamboo Forests Don't Help
Many of the world’s wild animals use mating calls to announce their readiness to mate and to find other specimens to hook up with, but curious resear...
OCT 23, 2018
Plants & Animals
OCT 23, 2018
Will This Technology Prevent Future Shark Attacks?
  The frequency of great white shark attacks is thought to be over-estimated by a magnitude of 10 to 100 times, but despite what any shark expert want...
Loading Comments...