MAR 31, 2015 04:57 AM PDT

A Star is Born...No, Really!

Astronomers have observed an eruption from a baby star in the Orion Constellation that appears to be a stellar growth spurt. Such an outburst has never been observed from a younger star. The eruption was first noticed by astronomers at the University of Toledo, and the resulting paper was published in the.February issue of The Astrophysical Journal
A stellar growth spurt in the Orion constellation produces a new star
The star, HOPS 383, is what's known as a "Class 0″ protostar, and located about 1,400 light years (8.2 quadrillion miles) from Earth in the nebula NGC 1977. Class 0 is the earliest stage of star development, occurring when a cloud of gas and dust begins to condense into a hot center surrounded by a disk.

This stage lasts about 150,000 years, a blink of an eye in a star's lifetime. Later, the center of the star will grow hotter and more massive, and the surrounding cloud may form planets, asteroids, or comets.

Because of the mass of dust that surrounds a Class 0 protostar, these early-stage stars do not shine light visible to the human eye. However, the heat at the protostar's center can be detected by instruments. These instruments, such as NASA's Spritzer Space Telescope, detected a 3500% increase in brightness in HOPS 383 in the past several years. Scientists believe that the outburst is due to rapid increase in growth of the center of the protostar, which leads to an increase in the amount of heat radiated outwards.

Via NASA, here's an image that shows the stellar eruption as captured by various space telescopes over the past several years.

(Source: Quartz.com)
About the Author
  • I'm a writer living in the Boston area. My interests include cancer research, cardiology and neuroscience. I want to be part of using the Internet and social media to educate professionals and patients in a collaborative environment.
You May Also Like
AUG 13, 2018
Space & Astronomy
AUG 13, 2018
Giant Star Sets Record for Lithium Composition, Researchers Say
While scanning far and wide with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), astronomers from the National Astronomical Observa...
AUG 22, 2018
Space & Astronomy
AUG 22, 2018
How Much Damage Could an Asteroid Impact Do?
There are so many asteroids in the solar system that it’s challenging to keep track of them. In fact, many asteroids are still lurking in the shadows...
SEP 10, 2018
Space & Astronomy
SEP 10, 2018
The James Webb Space Telescope May Help Astronomers Search for Alien Life
Despite an onslaught of delays that have thus far prevented NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope from being launched into space, the space observatory p...
SEP 17, 2018
Space & Astronomy
SEP 17, 2018
How Common Are Planetary Collisions?
Outer space is nothing short of a galactic free-for-all. Space rocks fly in virtually every direction, sporadically impacting larger objects like moons, pl...
SEP 26, 2018
Space & Astronomy
SEP 26, 2018
NASA Unveils Official Plans to Return to the Moon
NASA hasn’t sent any of its astronauts to the lunar surface for scientific exploration since the Apollo 17 mission launched from Earth’s surfac...
OCT 24, 2018
Space & Astronomy
OCT 24, 2018
NASA's Parker Solar Probe Snaps a Picture of Earth
Back in August, a Delta IV Heavy rocket ignited its engines and lofted NASA’s highly-anticipated Parker Solar Probe into space. Just over one month l...
Loading Comments...