MAR 26, 2018 7:14 PM PDT

Giant Exoplanet Orbiting a Brown Dwarf Revealed in Gravitational Microlensing Event

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Astronomers are always hunting for worlds beyond our solar system to learn more about how our planetary neighborhood formed and whether life exists anywhere else in the universe.

Many exoplanets are too distant to find or observe directly, but with the help of a phenomenon known to the astronomical community as gravitational microlensing, we can sometimes become tipped off to their existence.

An artist's impression of a brown dwarf.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

One of the most recent discoveries involves a giant exoplanet with around 25% less mass than Jupiter. Dubbed OGLE-2017-BLG-1522Lb, the alien world resides within the bulge of the Milky Way galaxy where it orbits a brown dwarf sporting about 46 times the mass of Jupiter.

The findings have been made available in a paper published to the arXiv.org server.

Related: There could be more than 100 million brown dwarfs hiding throughout the Milky Way

Citing the paper, the astronomers found the distant world on August 7, 2017, during the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE). They were using the Chilean-based 1.3m Warsaw telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory at the time.

As it would seem, a buffer zone of approximately 0.59 astronomical units separates OGLE-2017-BLG-1522Lb from its host star. Furthermore, it exists beyond what planetary scientists refer to as the ‘snow line,’ which means the exoplanet likely isn’t habitable.

The study comes with a truckload of uncertainties that need to be revisited in the future. For one, the brown dwarf’s mass isn’t set in stone yet, and this leaves an essential variable out of the research. On the flip side, this just might be the first-known giant exoplanet found orbiting around a brown dwarf host with a mass comparable to a planet.

It should be interesting to see whether the researchers can uncover more details about the system and solve the mystery of how it came to be. Only time will tell…

Source: Gizmodo

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
NOV 17, 2019
Space & Astronomy
NOV 17, 2019
How Much Do You Know About Triton?
Far beyond the reach of the terrestrial and gas giant planets in our solar system exists an entirely different class of world known as ice giants. Uranus a...
NOV 18, 2019
Space & Astronomy
NOV 18, 2019
Say Hello to the Largest Star Ever Discovered
There are so many stars in the modern universe that we couldn’t ever hope to count them all. Many are so distant from us that we can’t even see...
JAN 21, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 21, 2020
2020 Space Research: What to Expect
2019 was one of the most exciting years for space fans. Therefore it’s hard to believe that 2020 could bring something even more fascinating. Ho...
JAN 26, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 26, 2020
How Much Do You Know About the Planet Mercury?
Mercury is the solar system’s smallest planet, and it’s also the one residing closest to the Sun. But while Mercury is commonly shrugged off as...
FEB 11, 2020
Space & Astronomy
FEB 11, 2020
Why China Was Banned from the International Space Station
The International Space Station is just that – a place where international space agencies can work together in an effort to accomplish similar goals:...
FEB 23, 2020
Space & Astronomy
FEB 23, 2020
InSight Will Attempt to Push Down on its Mole Instrument
NASA’s sent its Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission to Mars so that it could deploy a sui...
Loading Comments...