JUL 20, 2018 12:49 PM PDT

RSTAR: The Creepy Crawling Robot

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Rising Sprawl-Tuned Autonomous Robot (RSTAR), which was introduced at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2018) in Brisbane, Australia, is the name of an innovative robot developed by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers. RSTAR is a highly maneuverable robot that was created for rescue operations. It is capable of climbing rough terrain, creeping in tight places, and crawling on all kind of surfaces. RSTAR works to utilize its adjustable sprawling wheel legs that are attached to a body capable of moving independently. RSTAR can reposition to climb over obstacles no matter how large, run on flat surfaces, and enclosed spaces such as pipe tunnels or narrow gaps.

The robot can use its round wheels to travel at high speeds, a little more three feet per second on many surfaces including like thick mud and sand, without getting stuck. By pressing its wheels to the wall surfaces and without touching the floor, it can also climb vertically and crawl horizontally.

"The RSTAR is ideal for search and rescue operations in unstructured environments, such as collapsed buildings or flooded areas, where it must adapt and overcome a variety of successive obstacles to reach its target," says Dr. David Zarrouk, a lecturer in BGU's Department of Mechanical Engineering, and head of the Bio-Inspired and Medical Robotics Lab. "It is the newest member of our family of STAR robots." Dr. Zarrouk along with GU student, Liran Yehezkel, and fellow robotic workers, designed RSTAR to be functionally reliable without any kinks.

RSTAR was specifically designed to change its shape and overcome common obstacles without the need of external mechanical intervention. With relatively low energy consumption, RSTAR proves to be ideal for a broad range of rescue missions that may require extensive use of time.

Source: American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

About the Author
  • Nouran earned her BS and MS in Biology at IUPUI and currently shares her love of science by teaching. She enjoys writing on various topics as well including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
JAN 15, 2020
Technology
JAN 15, 2020
Brain-Inspired Computing
The invention of the transistor, which lets a weak signal control much larger flow, was developed in 1947 and since its development computing has been on t...
JAN 21, 2020
Technology
JAN 21, 2020
Expanding Microchip Storage with 3D Technology
Most recently engineers are utilizing 3D components on a standardized 2D microchip to use up to 100 times less chip space. Researchers added up to three or...
FEB 11, 2020
Earth & The Environment
FEB 11, 2020
The mark of a contrail on the atmosphere
Do you know what an airplane contrail is? Have you ever looked up into the sky with that azure blue backdrop and seen the elegant white tail slowly evapora...
FEB 07, 2020
Technology
FEB 07, 2020
Flyception 2.0: Tracks Complex Social Behavior of Flies
Researchers at the University of California San Diego now have a better understanding of the social behavior of insets thanks to advanced imaging technolog...
FEB 17, 2020
Space & Astronomy
FEB 17, 2020
SpaceX Launches More Starlink Satellites, But Fails First Stage Landing
SpaceX launched yet another one of its renowned Falcon 9 rockets on Monday, this time carrying a plethora of its Starlink satellites that will fortify the...
FEB 24, 2020
Health & Medicine
FEB 24, 2020
Breast Cancer Screening, without the Radiation
Researchers from the University of Waterloo have developed a prototype of a novel technology that is capable of screening for breast cancer without using r...
Loading Comments...